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Effect of Vibration on Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus


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1 Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
     

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Background: Recent researches support the use of passive vibration (PV) to increase circulation without the risk of burns. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of short duration vibration on skin blood flow (SBF) in Type 2 diabetics. Materials and Method: 18 subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus between 47-74 years of age, and 18 age matched controls between 50-75 years of age received PV on the anterior aspect of forearm and on plantar aspect of first three metatarsal heads. SBF was measured before, after and 10 minutes post vibration.

Results: There was a significant difference in the foot and forearm SBF across time for both groups. However, there was no significant difference in foot and forearm SBF across time between the groups. Greatest percent increase was seen in the diabetic foot SBF (118.53%) from baseline to end of vibration vs. non diabetic foot (37.62 %). Also, looking 10 minutes post, there was a less change in diabetic foot SBF (-15.25%) vs. non diabetic foot (-27.64%). There was only a slight increase from the start to the end of the vibration in diabetic subjects (129.78%) vs. non diabetic subjects (127.97%). There was no significant change on the foot SBF vs. the forearm at the baseline, at the end of vibration and at 10 minutes post between the groups (F=.679, P=.476).

Conclusion: The diabetes mellitus group with fair to good glucose control responded similarly to PV as compared to non-diabetes mellitus group although there was no significant difference in foot and forearm SBF across time between the groups.


Keywords

Vibration, Blood Flow, Aging, Diabetes Mellitus, Nitric Oxide
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  • Effect of Vibration on Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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Authors

Everett B. Lohman
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Kanikkai Steni Balan Sackiriyas
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Gurinder S. Bains
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Kulbhushan H. Dhamane
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Kinjal J. Solani
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Chandip K. Raju
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States
Howard W. Sulzle
Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda-92350, California, United States

Abstract


Background: Recent researches support the use of passive vibration (PV) to increase circulation without the risk of burns. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of short duration vibration on skin blood flow (SBF) in Type 2 diabetics. Materials and Method: 18 subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus between 47-74 years of age, and 18 age matched controls between 50-75 years of age received PV on the anterior aspect of forearm and on plantar aspect of first three metatarsal heads. SBF was measured before, after and 10 minutes post vibration.

Results: There was a significant difference in the foot and forearm SBF across time for both groups. However, there was no significant difference in foot and forearm SBF across time between the groups. Greatest percent increase was seen in the diabetic foot SBF (118.53%) from baseline to end of vibration vs. non diabetic foot (37.62 %). Also, looking 10 minutes post, there was a less change in diabetic foot SBF (-15.25%) vs. non diabetic foot (-27.64%). There was only a slight increase from the start to the end of the vibration in diabetic subjects (129.78%) vs. non diabetic subjects (127.97%). There was no significant change on the foot SBF vs. the forearm at the baseline, at the end of vibration and at 10 minutes post between the groups (F=.679, P=.476).

Conclusion: The diabetes mellitus group with fair to good glucose control responded similarly to PV as compared to non-diabetes mellitus group although there was no significant difference in foot and forearm SBF across time between the groups.


Keywords


Vibration, Blood Flow, Aging, Diabetes Mellitus, Nitric Oxide

References