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Cervico-thoracic Mobilization to Address LBA for a Patient with Lumbar Spondylolisthesis


Affiliations
1 Department (PT), Swami Vivekananda National Institute of Rehabilitation Training and Research, Olatpur, Cuttack, Orissa, India
2 Department of Neurology, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, India
3 Department of Orthopedics, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, India
     

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Background and Purpose: This case report describes the examination, intervention and outcome of a patient with lumbar spondylolisthesis. The patient was managed by myofascial release of levator scapulae and cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization. There is no literature found describing these interventions for lumbar spondylolisthesis.

Case Description: The patient was a 43 years old woman with LBA with radiating pain to left lower limb due to lumbar spondylolisthesis. She received stretching of levator scapulae, piriformis & rectus femoris, cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization, passive lumbar flexion mobilization, core strengthening exercises. Treatment was given 5 days a week for 20 sittings.

Outcomes: Percentage of slippage.

Conclusion: Stretching of levator scapulae and cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization may help in reducing forward slippage in lumbar spondylolisthesis.


Keywords

Mobilisation, Cervico-Thoracic Dysfunctions, Myofascial Pain Syndrome, Spondylolisthesis, Muscle Energy Technique, Maitland
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  • Cervico-thoracic Mobilization to Address LBA for a Patient with Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

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Authors

P. P. Mohanty
Department (PT), Swami Vivekananda National Institute of Rehabilitation Training and Research, Olatpur, Cuttack, Orissa, India
B. Kuanar
Department of Neurology, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, India
B. K. Behera
Department of Orthopedics, SCB Medical College, Cuttack, India

Abstract


Background and Purpose: This case report describes the examination, intervention and outcome of a patient with lumbar spondylolisthesis. The patient was managed by myofascial release of levator scapulae and cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization. There is no literature found describing these interventions for lumbar spondylolisthesis.

Case Description: The patient was a 43 years old woman with LBA with radiating pain to left lower limb due to lumbar spondylolisthesis. She received stretching of levator scapulae, piriformis & rectus femoris, cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization, passive lumbar flexion mobilization, core strengthening exercises. Treatment was given 5 days a week for 20 sittings.

Outcomes: Percentage of slippage.

Conclusion: Stretching of levator scapulae and cervico-thoracic central PA mobilization may help in reducing forward slippage in lumbar spondylolisthesis.


Keywords


Mobilisation, Cervico-Thoracic Dysfunctions, Myofascial Pain Syndrome, Spondylolisthesis, Muscle Energy Technique, Maitland

References