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Effect of High Frequency, Low Magnitude Vibration on Bone Density and Lean Content in Children with Down Syndrome


Affiliations
1 1Department of Physical Therapy for Growth and Development Disorders in Children and its Surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Egypt
     

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Purpose: to examine the effects of high frequency, low magnitude vibration on bone density and muscle content in children with Down syndrome.

Design: Experimental study (randomized control trial) Subjects: Thirty children with DS from both sexes, ranging in age from 4 to 7 years. They were divided randomly into two groups of equal number A (control) and B (study)

Procedure: Evaluation before and after three months of treatment for each child of the two groups was conducted via using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Group A received a selected exercise program, while group B received the same exercise program given to group A in addition to proprioceptive stimulation in the form of whole body vibration (WBV) training.

Results: Significant improvement was observed in the two groups when comparing their pre and post-treatment mean values. The mean ± SD of BMD post treatment for control group was 0.75 ± 0.03 and that for study group was 0.79 ± 0.03. The mean difference between both groups was -0.04. There was a significant difference between control and study groups in BMD post treatment.

Conclusion: mechanical vibration seems to improve BMD and muscular content in DS children making the treatment of osteoporosis possible.


Keywords

Down Syndrome (DS), Bone Mineral Density (BMD), Vibration
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  • Effect of High Frequency, Low Magnitude Vibration on Bone Density and Lean Content in Children with Down Syndrome

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Authors

Amira E. Elbagalaty
1Department of Physical Therapy for Growth and Development Disorders in Children and its Surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Egypt

Abstract


Purpose: to examine the effects of high frequency, low magnitude vibration on bone density and muscle content in children with Down syndrome.

Design: Experimental study (randomized control trial) Subjects: Thirty children with DS from both sexes, ranging in age from 4 to 7 years. They were divided randomly into two groups of equal number A (control) and B (study)

Procedure: Evaluation before and after three months of treatment for each child of the two groups was conducted via using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Group A received a selected exercise program, while group B received the same exercise program given to group A in addition to proprioceptive stimulation in the form of whole body vibration (WBV) training.

Results: Significant improvement was observed in the two groups when comparing their pre and post-treatment mean values. The mean ± SD of BMD post treatment for control group was 0.75 ± 0.03 and that for study group was 0.79 ± 0.03. The mean difference between both groups was -0.04. There was a significant difference between control and study groups in BMD post treatment.

Conclusion: mechanical vibration seems to improve BMD and muscular content in DS children making the treatment of osteoporosis possible.


Keywords


Down Syndrome (DS), Bone Mineral Density (BMD), Vibration

References