Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Perceived Stress, Sources and Severity of Stress among Physiotherapy Students in an Indian College


Affiliations
1 Emeritus, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Objective: To study the Perceived stress in physiotherapy students as per questionnaire along with assessment of corroborative clinical parameters and perceived stress score.

Method: A cross-sectional, questionnaire based survey was carried out among undergraduate physiotherapy students of Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil college of physiotherapy, Pune, India. Perceived stress was assessed using the perceived stress scale (PSS 10). A 27-item questionnaire was used to assess sources of stress and their severity. Another 11-item questionnaire was used to find possible institutional stress reducing factors.

Results: Of the physiotherapy students who were administered the questionnaire, 71 (74%) respondents participated in this study. The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of the study participants was 19.39 ± 1.12 years, with a range of 18-23 years. Out of the 71 students, 57 (80.3%) were female students and 14 (19.7%) were male students. The mean PSS score was 20.50 (SD 5.96). The main sources of stress were found to be related to physical, emotional and academic factors. The main institutional stress reducing factors were picnics (59.2%), vacations (56.3%), interaction with friends (52.1%), and personal hobbies (54.9%).

Conclusion: High levels of perceived stress were found in Physiotherapy students. The physical, emotional and academic factor causes stress in little to great extent.


Keywords

Stress, Undergraduate Physiotherapy Students, Institutional Stress Reducing Factors, Stress Inducing Factors
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Selye H. Stress without Distress. New York: Harper & Row. 1974.
  • Rosenham DL, Seligman ME. Abnormal Psychology, (2nd ed.). New York: Norton. 1989.
  • Myers DG. Stress and Health. In: Exploring Psychology (6th ed.). New York: Worth Publishers. 2005;p. 402.
  • Lazarus RS. Theory-Based Stress Measurement. Psychology Inquiry. 1990;1(1): 3–13.
  • Aktekin M, Karaman T, Senol YY, Erdem S, Erengin H, Akaydin M. Anxiety, Depression and Stressful Life Events among Medical Students: A Prospective Study in Antalya, Turkey. Med Educ. 2001;35(1):12–17.
  • Guthrie EA, Black D, Bagalkote H, Shaw C, Campbell M, Creed F. Psychological Stress and Burnout in Medical Students: A Five-year Prospective Longitudinal Study. J R Soc Med. 1998;91(5):237–243.
  • Dahlin M, Joneborg N, Runeson B. Stress and depression among medical students: a cross sectional study. Med Educ 2005;39:594-604.
  • Zocolillo M, Murphy GE, Wetzel RD. Depression among medical students. J Affect Disord 1986;11:91-96.
  • Tyssen R, Vaghum P, Gronvold NT, Ekeberg O. Suicide ideation among medical students and youth physicians: a nationwide and prospective of prevalence and predictors. J Affect Disord 2001;64:69-79.
  • Tyssen R, Hem E, Vaghum P, Gronvold NT, Ekeberg O. The process of suicidal planning among medical doctors: predictors in a longitudinal Norwegian sample. J Affect Disord 2004;80:191-198.
  • Malathi A, Damodaran A. Stress due to exams in medical students-role of yoga. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol 1999;43:218-24.
  • Bramness JA, Fixdal TC, Vaglum P. Effect of medical school stress on the mental health of medical students in early and late clinical curriculum. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1991;84:340-5.
  • Vitaliano PP, Russo J, Carr JE, Heerwagen JH. Medical school pressures and their relationship to anxiety. J Nerve Ment Dis 1984;172:730-736.
  • Tyssen R, Vaghum P, Gronvold NT, Ekeberg O. Factors in medical school that predict postgraduate mental health problems in need of treatment: a nationwide longitudinal study. Med Educ 2001;35:110-120.
  • Cohen S, Kamarak T, Mermelstein R: A global measure of perceived stress. J Health Soc Behav 1983; 24:385-96.
  • Ortmeier BG, Wolfgang AP, Martin BC. Career commitment, career plans, and perceived stress: a survey of pharmacy students. Am J Pharm Educ 1991;55:138-42.
  • Wolfgang AP. The health professions stress inventory. Psychol Rep 1988;62:220-2.
  • Lapane KL, Hughes CM. Job satisfaction and stress among pharmacists in the long-term care sector. Consult Pharm 2006;21:287-92.
  • Shaikh BT, Kahloon A, Kazmi M, Khalid H, Nawaz K, Khan N, Khan S. Students, stress and coping strategies: a case of Pakistani medical school. Educ Health (Abingdon) 2004;17:346-53.
  • Supe AN. A study of stress in medical students at Seth G. S. Medical College. J Postgrad Med 1998;44:1-6.
  • Saipanish R. Stress among medical students in Thai medical school. Med Teach 2003;25:502-6.

Abstract Views: 271

PDF Views: 0




  • Perceived Stress, Sources and Severity of Stress among Physiotherapy Students in an Indian College

Abstract Views: 271  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Tushar J. Palekar
Emeritus, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India
M. G. Mokashi
Emeritus, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India

Abstract


Objective: To study the Perceived stress in physiotherapy students as per questionnaire along with assessment of corroborative clinical parameters and perceived stress score.

Method: A cross-sectional, questionnaire based survey was carried out among undergraduate physiotherapy students of Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil college of physiotherapy, Pune, India. Perceived stress was assessed using the perceived stress scale (PSS 10). A 27-item questionnaire was used to assess sources of stress and their severity. Another 11-item questionnaire was used to find possible institutional stress reducing factors.

Results: Of the physiotherapy students who were administered the questionnaire, 71 (74%) respondents participated in this study. The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of the study participants was 19.39 ± 1.12 years, with a range of 18-23 years. Out of the 71 students, 57 (80.3%) were female students and 14 (19.7%) were male students. The mean PSS score was 20.50 (SD 5.96). The main sources of stress were found to be related to physical, emotional and academic factors. The main institutional stress reducing factors were picnics (59.2%), vacations (56.3%), interaction with friends (52.1%), and personal hobbies (54.9%).

Conclusion: High levels of perceived stress were found in Physiotherapy students. The physical, emotional and academic factor causes stress in little to great extent.


Keywords


Stress, Undergraduate Physiotherapy Students, Institutional Stress Reducing Factors, Stress Inducing Factors

References