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Comparative Study between the effects of Static Somatosensory Balance Training and Static Vestibular Balance Training on Dynamic Balance and Fear of Fall in Institutionalized Elderly


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1 Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India
     

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Purpose: To determine carry over effects of static somatosensory balance training or static vestibular balance training on dynamic balance and fear of fall in institutionalized elderly.

Subjects: Forty subjects aged 60 to 80 years.

Method: Subjects were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria and were divided into two groups. Group 1 underwent static vestibular balance training and group 2 underwent static somatosensory balance training. The subject's dynamic balance was measured with the help of functional reach test (FRT) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and fear of fall was measured by Activities Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC). Measurements were taken at baseline, immediately after four weeks of intervention and after four weeks of follow up from intervention. Frequency of falling was also determined by noting the number of falls that occurred during the follow up period. Independent t-test was used to compare the difference between the group as well as one-way Anova and Post hoc bonferroni were used to compare the outcomes within the two groups.

Results: The results documented that static balance training has carry over effects on dynamic balance; this was justified by significant difference in the scores of functional reach test when between groups comparison was done. Also there was significant improvement in fear of fall in elderly subjects, as evidenced by statistically significant difference in the scores of activities specific balance confidence. The p-value of ABC was 0.01 in group 1 and group 2 when between groups comparison was done.

Conclusion: Static balance training has carry over effect on dynamic balance this was documented by statistically significant scores of FRT and ABC. The significant results between the two groups hypothesize that static balance training could be an effective part of rehabilitation settings. Despite the many age-related changes occurring in the multiple systems that contribute to good balance and mobility, growing evidence suggests that we can reverse, or at least slow, the rate of decline occurring in some or all of these systems.1


Keywords

Balance, Fear of Fall, Institutionalized elderly, Activities Specific Balance Confidence
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  • Comparative Study between the effects of Static Somatosensory Balance Training and Static Vestibular Balance Training on Dynamic Balance and Fear of Fall in Institutionalized Elderly

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Authors

Jyoti Laroia
Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India
Nusrat Hamdani
Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India
Majumi Mohammad Noohu
Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India

Abstract


Purpose: To determine carry over effects of static somatosensory balance training or static vestibular balance training on dynamic balance and fear of fall in institutionalized elderly.

Subjects: Forty subjects aged 60 to 80 years.

Method: Subjects were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria and were divided into two groups. Group 1 underwent static vestibular balance training and group 2 underwent static somatosensory balance training. The subject's dynamic balance was measured with the help of functional reach test (FRT) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and fear of fall was measured by Activities Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC). Measurements were taken at baseline, immediately after four weeks of intervention and after four weeks of follow up from intervention. Frequency of falling was also determined by noting the number of falls that occurred during the follow up period. Independent t-test was used to compare the difference between the group as well as one-way Anova and Post hoc bonferroni were used to compare the outcomes within the two groups.

Results: The results documented that static balance training has carry over effects on dynamic balance; this was justified by significant difference in the scores of functional reach test when between groups comparison was done. Also there was significant improvement in fear of fall in elderly subjects, as evidenced by statistically significant difference in the scores of activities specific balance confidence. The p-value of ABC was 0.01 in group 1 and group 2 when between groups comparison was done.

Conclusion: Static balance training has carry over effect on dynamic balance this was documented by statistically significant scores of FRT and ABC. The significant results between the two groups hypothesize that static balance training could be an effective part of rehabilitation settings. Despite the many age-related changes occurring in the multiple systems that contribute to good balance and mobility, growing evidence suggests that we can reverse, or at least slow, the rate of decline occurring in some or all of these systems.1


Keywords


Balance, Fear of Fall, Institutionalized elderly, Activities Specific Balance Confidence

References