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Effect of Brief Intense TENS and Cryotherapy on the Symptoms Associated with Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness in Healthy Male Subjects


Affiliations
1 Jamia Hamdard New Delhi, India
2 Department Majeedia Hospital, New Delhi, India
     

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Objective: The study investigated the effect of brief intense TENS and ice on pain relaxed elbow extension angle.

Design and setting: Three sets of concentric and eccentric action induced delayed onset of the elbow flexors of non dominant hand. Pre exercise measures were recorded for relaxed elbow extension range and perceived muscle pain. Group A received ice treatment for 15 minutes, group B received brief intense TENS (100 Hz, 100 milliseconds, maximum tolerable intensity), Group C received sham TENS treatments after 48 hours of post-exercise.

Subjects: Forty five healthy male subjects

Measurements: Relaxed elbow extension angle and perceived muscle pain was recorded before exercise, before treatment after 48 hours post exercise and after treatment.

Results: Readings were compared for difference using ANOVA it was found that there was statistically significant difference p=0.045 (p

Conclusion: Cryotherapy was effective in reducing the perceived pain in elbow flexors after eccentric bouts


Keywords

Pain, TENS, Relaxed Elbow Extension Angle, Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness
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  • Effect of Brief Intense TENS and Cryotherapy on the Symptoms Associated with Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness in Healthy Male Subjects

Abstract Views: 249  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

S. Aadil Rashid
Jamia Hamdard New Delhi, India
Nishat Quddus
Jamia Hamdard New Delhi, India
Belsare
Department Majeedia Hospital, New Delhi, India

Abstract


Objective: The study investigated the effect of brief intense TENS and ice on pain relaxed elbow extension angle.

Design and setting: Three sets of concentric and eccentric action induced delayed onset of the elbow flexors of non dominant hand. Pre exercise measures were recorded for relaxed elbow extension range and perceived muscle pain. Group A received ice treatment for 15 minutes, group B received brief intense TENS (100 Hz, 100 milliseconds, maximum tolerable intensity), Group C received sham TENS treatments after 48 hours of post-exercise.

Subjects: Forty five healthy male subjects

Measurements: Relaxed elbow extension angle and perceived muscle pain was recorded before exercise, before treatment after 48 hours post exercise and after treatment.

Results: Readings were compared for difference using ANOVA it was found that there was statistically significant difference p=0.045 (p

Conclusion: Cryotherapy was effective in reducing the perceived pain in elbow flexors after eccentric bouts


Keywords


Pain, TENS, Relaxed Elbow Extension Angle, Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

References