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Effect of Fast Tempo Vocal and Instrumental Music on Cardiovascular Parameters, Perceived Exertion and Stress Rate During High Intensity Interval Training in Asymptomatic Subjects:A Randomized Clinical Trial


Affiliations
1 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physiorapy, KAHER’s Institute of Physiorapy, Belagavi, Karnataka, India
     

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Background and Purpose: ACSM defines physical activity as bodily movement that is produced by contraction of skeletal muscle. Music is said to be a sensory modality that can have effect on exercise. purpose of study was to study outcome of music with faster tempo and instrumental type, on cardiovascular, RPE, mood, stress and enjoyment thus improving observance to HIIT in asymptomatic subjects.

Methods: By random sampling method 40 subjects, male and female (20-30 years) with minimum to moderate amount of physical activity were selected and a two week trial with treadmill was done. Participants were be divided into 2 groups for HIIT: group A with fast vocal music and group B with instrumental music. Mood and stress was assessed pre and post using Abbreviated Profile Of Mood State (POMS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) respectively, RPE was taken over time using Borg scale respectively, enjoyment was assessed post HIIT using Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES ).

Results: Statistical significance was found in heart rate in vocal group, mood and enjoyment in both groups with a p value of < 0.005

Conclusion: present study of 2 weeks concluded that vocal and instrumental music had significant effect on heart rate, stress, enjoyment, mood during high intensity interval training


Keywords

Enjoyment, High Intensity Interval Training, Mood, Music, Rate of Perceived Exertion, Stress
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  • Effect of Fast Tempo Vocal and Instrumental Music on Cardiovascular Parameters, Perceived Exertion and Stress Rate During High Intensity Interval Training in Asymptomatic Subjects:A Randomized Clinical Trial

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Authors

B. R. Ganesh
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physiorapy, KAHER’s Institute of Physiorapy, Belagavi, Karnataka, India
Surya Krishnanunni
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physiorapy, KAHER’s Institute of Physiorapy, Belagavi, Karnataka, India

Abstract


Background and Purpose: ACSM defines physical activity as bodily movement that is produced by contraction of skeletal muscle. Music is said to be a sensory modality that can have effect on exercise. purpose of study was to study outcome of music with faster tempo and instrumental type, on cardiovascular, RPE, mood, stress and enjoyment thus improving observance to HIIT in asymptomatic subjects.

Methods: By random sampling method 40 subjects, male and female (20-30 years) with minimum to moderate amount of physical activity were selected and a two week trial with treadmill was done. Participants were be divided into 2 groups for HIIT: group A with fast vocal music and group B with instrumental music. Mood and stress was assessed pre and post using Abbreviated Profile Of Mood State (POMS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) respectively, RPE was taken over time using Borg scale respectively, enjoyment was assessed post HIIT using Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES ).

Results: Statistical significance was found in heart rate in vocal group, mood and enjoyment in both groups with a p value of < 0.005

Conclusion: present study of 2 weeks concluded that vocal and instrumental music had significant effect on heart rate, stress, enjoyment, mood during high intensity interval training


Keywords


Enjoyment, High Intensity Interval Training, Mood, Music, Rate of Perceived Exertion, Stress

References