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Effect of Structured Bladder Training in Urinary Incontinence


Affiliations
1 Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed To Be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Neurosciences, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed To Be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India
     

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Introduction: Urinary incontinence is considered a very distressing condition affecting multiple domains of human life i.e. social, physical, psychological, occupational, domestic, and sexual aspects experienced by all ages. However, only pathophysiology varies according to each condition, and therefore demanding different therapeutic approaches according to the mechanism of urine loss. This study was designed to find out the effect of structured bladder training in urinary incontinence. To find out effect of conventional bladder training in urinary incontinence. To compare the effect between two on the basis of demographic variables.

Method: This was an experimental study with the total of 28 spinal cord injury patients who had urinary incontinence were selected with random allocation from the Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad in this study. Their ages were 20 years and above according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Prior consent was taken. They were divided into two groups: group A and group B. Group A received conventional therapy and group B received structured bladder training with conventional training. Pre assessment was taken prior to the treatment. These subjects were treated for 4 weeks, 3 days per week, 30 – 45 min. After 4 weeks the post treatment assessment was taken. The outcome measures were included King’s Health Questionnaire and 1 hour Pad Test.

Results: The obtained results showed a statistically highly significant improvement (p < 0.0001) noted in the urinary incontinence in spinal cord injury patients.

Conclusion: It was concluded that structured bladder training was effective in controlling urinary incontinence secondary to spinal cord injury.


Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury, Urinary Incontinence, King’s Health Questionnaire, Pad Test.
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  • Effect of Structured Bladder Training in Urinary Incontinence

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Authors

Asavari J. Gaikwad
Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed To Be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India
Suraj B. Kanase
Department of Neurosciences, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Deemed To Be University, Karad, Maharashtra, India

Abstract


Introduction: Urinary incontinence is considered a very distressing condition affecting multiple domains of human life i.e. social, physical, psychological, occupational, domestic, and sexual aspects experienced by all ages. However, only pathophysiology varies according to each condition, and therefore demanding different therapeutic approaches according to the mechanism of urine loss. This study was designed to find out the effect of structured bladder training in urinary incontinence. To find out effect of conventional bladder training in urinary incontinence. To compare the effect between two on the basis of demographic variables.

Method: This was an experimental study with the total of 28 spinal cord injury patients who had urinary incontinence were selected with random allocation from the Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad in this study. Their ages were 20 years and above according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Prior consent was taken. They were divided into two groups: group A and group B. Group A received conventional therapy and group B received structured bladder training with conventional training. Pre assessment was taken prior to the treatment. These subjects were treated for 4 weeks, 3 days per week, 30 – 45 min. After 4 weeks the post treatment assessment was taken. The outcome measures were included King’s Health Questionnaire and 1 hour Pad Test.

Results: The obtained results showed a statistically highly significant improvement (p < 0.0001) noted in the urinary incontinence in spinal cord injury patients.

Conclusion: It was concluded that structured bladder training was effective in controlling urinary incontinence secondary to spinal cord injury.


Keywords


Spinal Cord Injury, Urinary Incontinence, King’s Health Questionnaire, Pad Test.

References