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Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Supinator and Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis in Lateral Epicondylitis


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1 Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune, India
     

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Introduction– Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a myalgic condition in which muscle and musculotendinous pain are the primary symptoms. Some muscles are likely to develop Myofascial trigger points in cases of lateral epicondylitis and become possible cause of mainstay of symptoms. Hence the study was undertaken to find the prevalence of myofascial trigger points in such muscles.

Methodology & Results – 40 individuals aged between 20-50 years fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for the study with acute and chronic lateral epicondylitis. Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Supinator and Extensor carpi radialis brevis were checked for the presence of trigger point by palpation. Pressure algometer was used to check the pain threshold of each point. When the subject reports feeling pain the action of pressure is stopped and reading is recorded.

Results showed a higher prevalence in females than males. The most prevalent area for trigger point was the brachioradialis followed by biceps brachii, extensor carpi radialis, triceps brachii and the least prevalent was the supinator.

Conclusion - This study provides that the relation between myofascial trigger points in lateral epicondylitis is relatively high especially in Brachioradialis, It also shows that latent trigger points don’t lead to severe functional disability.


Keywords

Tennis Elbow, Taut Band, Patient Related Tennis Elbow Evaluation, Myalgia.
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  • Prevalence of Myofascial Trigger Points in Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Supinator and Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis in Lateral Epicondylitis

Abstract Views: 36  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Amita Aggarwal
Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune, India
Jenit Daniel
Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune, India
Tushar J. Palekar
Dr. D.Y. Patil College of Physiotherapy, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pimpri, Pune, India

Abstract


Introduction– Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a myalgic condition in which muscle and musculotendinous pain are the primary symptoms. Some muscles are likely to develop Myofascial trigger points in cases of lateral epicondylitis and become possible cause of mainstay of symptoms. Hence the study was undertaken to find the prevalence of myofascial trigger points in such muscles.

Methodology & Results – 40 individuals aged between 20-50 years fulfilling the inclusion criteria were selected for the study with acute and chronic lateral epicondylitis. Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Supinator and Extensor carpi radialis brevis were checked for the presence of trigger point by palpation. Pressure algometer was used to check the pain threshold of each point. When the subject reports feeling pain the action of pressure is stopped and reading is recorded.

Results showed a higher prevalence in females than males. The most prevalent area for trigger point was the brachioradialis followed by biceps brachii, extensor carpi radialis, triceps brachii and the least prevalent was the supinator.

Conclusion - This study provides that the relation between myofascial trigger points in lateral epicondylitis is relatively high especially in Brachioradialis, It also shows that latent trigger points don’t lead to severe functional disability.


Keywords


Tennis Elbow, Taut Band, Patient Related Tennis Elbow Evaluation, Myalgia.

References