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A Study on Nutritional Profile of Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers of Uttar Pradesh


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1 Department of Anthropology, Pondicherry University, Puducherry - 605 014, India
     

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Background

Man needs a wide range of nutrients to lead a healthy and active life and these are derived through the diet they consume daily. Good nutrition is a basic component of health. The present paper assesses the Nutritional Profile of Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers of Uttar Pradesh.

Methods

Out of total 920 subjects studied, 463 Textile Workers and 457 Non Textile Workers were randomly selected and interviewed for the purpose of study; Tools used were three days home visits and group meetings. Anthropometric measurements taken were height and weight. Dietary data was collected using standardized cups methods.

Results

The findings depict that most of the Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers were basically non-vegetarian and majority of the Textile Workers and their families mostly missed regular pattern of three meals a day. Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED) was found to be more prevalent in Textile Workers as compared to Non Textile Workers but the prevalence of over weight/obesity was seen more in Non Textile Workers.

Conclusions

The nutritional status of the Textile Workers and their families was not an excellent one


Keywords

Textile Workers, Non-Textile Workers, Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED), Nutritional Status
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  • A Study on Nutritional Profile of Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers of Uttar Pradesh

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Authors

Ajeet Jaiswal
Department of Anthropology, Pondicherry University, Puducherry - 605 014, India

Abstract


Background

Man needs a wide range of nutrients to lead a healthy and active life and these are derived through the diet they consume daily. Good nutrition is a basic component of health. The present paper assesses the Nutritional Profile of Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers of Uttar Pradesh.

Methods

Out of total 920 subjects studied, 463 Textile Workers and 457 Non Textile Workers were randomly selected and interviewed for the purpose of study; Tools used were three days home visits and group meetings. Anthropometric measurements taken were height and weight. Dietary data was collected using standardized cups methods.

Results

The findings depict that most of the Textile Workers and Non Textile Workers were basically non-vegetarian and majority of the Textile Workers and their families mostly missed regular pattern of three meals a day. Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED) was found to be more prevalent in Textile Workers as compared to Non Textile Workers but the prevalence of over weight/obesity was seen more in Non Textile Workers.

Conclusions

The nutritional status of the Textile Workers and their families was not an excellent one


Keywords


Textile Workers, Non-Textile Workers, Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED), Nutritional Status

References