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Early Versus Conventional Postoperative Oral Feeding after Elective Colonic Anastomosis


Affiliations
1 Assistant Lecturer of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
2 Professor of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
3 Lecturer of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
4 Assistant Professor of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
     

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Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the safety of early oral feeding after elective colonic anastomosis. Method: The study was conducted upon 40 cases at Kasr Al- Ainy teaching hospital. The cases were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Early feeding): 20 patients began fluids on the first postoperative day and advanced to a regular diet within the next 24–48 h, as tolerated. Group 2 (Regular feeding): 20 patients were managed in the traditional way (nothing by mouth for five days). Results: Anastomotic leakage was 0% in early feeding group versus 5% in conventional feeding group. Early oral feeding was tolerated in 90% of patients in early feeding group. The time to first passage of flatus was sooner in the early feeding group (1.05 ± 0.22) than the traditional group (1.95 ± 1.05), p= 0.001. The risk of wound infection was significantly reduced with the early feeding group (10.0%) when compared with the conventional feeding group (40.0%), p = 0.028. Length of hospital stay was significantly less in the early feeding group. Conclusion: Early oral feeding after elective colonic anastomosis is safe and can be tolerated by the majority of patients. Early oral feeding is associated with early return of bowel habits and reduced length of hospital stay. It is also associated with reduced risk of wound infection.

Keywords

(Early feeding, Colonic anastomosis, Anastomotic leak)
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  • Early Versus Conventional Postoperative Oral Feeding after Elective Colonic Anastomosis

Abstract Views: 90  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Kerolos A. Barsoum
Assistant Lecturer of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
Sami M. Said
Professor of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
Karim K. Maurice
Lecturer of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt
Doaa A. Mansour
Assistant Professor of General Surgery, Cairo University Medical School, Kasr Alainy, Egypt

Abstract


Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the safety of early oral feeding after elective colonic anastomosis. Method: The study was conducted upon 40 cases at Kasr Al- Ainy teaching hospital. The cases were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Early feeding): 20 patients began fluids on the first postoperative day and advanced to a regular diet within the next 24–48 h, as tolerated. Group 2 (Regular feeding): 20 patients were managed in the traditional way (nothing by mouth for five days). Results: Anastomotic leakage was 0% in early feeding group versus 5% in conventional feeding group. Early oral feeding was tolerated in 90% of patients in early feeding group. The time to first passage of flatus was sooner in the early feeding group (1.05 ± 0.22) than the traditional group (1.95 ± 1.05), p= 0.001. The risk of wound infection was significantly reduced with the early feeding group (10.0%) when compared with the conventional feeding group (40.0%), p = 0.028. Length of hospital stay was significantly less in the early feeding group. Conclusion: Early oral feeding after elective colonic anastomosis is safe and can be tolerated by the majority of patients. Early oral feeding is associated with early return of bowel habits and reduced length of hospital stay. It is also associated with reduced risk of wound infection.

Keywords


(Early feeding, Colonic anastomosis, Anastomotic leak)



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v11%2Fi2%2F2020%2Fijphrd%2F194998