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Detection and Enumeration of Parasitic Infections in Stool Samples from Tertiary Care Hospital of Rural Setting


Affiliations
1 M.Sc. Student, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
3 Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
     

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Background: Parasitic infections are the major public concern particularly in developing countries like India. Routinely used microscopy method for the detection of parasitic infections have compromised sensitivity. Materials and Method: The study was carried out on 500 stool samples received in Department of Microbiology MMIMSR, Mullana (Haryana) for a period of 6 months (August 2017 to January 2018). Stool samples for detection of ova and cyst were included. Result: Of these 500 samples examined, 235 (47%) stool samples showed positive results for ova/cyst after the use of simple salt floatation technique while it was merely 33% (n-165) without using the salt floatation method. of the 235 positive samples 29.8% were cyst of Giardia lamblia followed by eggs of Ascarislumbricoides (Fertilized and unfertilized) and cyst of Entamoebahistolytica each of 19.1%, Ancylostomaduodenale 14.9%, Hymenolepis nana 10.6%, Entamoeba coli 4.2% and Trichuristrichiura 2.1% were also identified. Conclusion: There is a need for more tests that do not sacrifice sensitivity and that can be used in poor resource field settings.

Keywords

Parasitic infection diagnosis, Ova/cyst, stool samples.
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  • Detection and Enumeration of Parasitic Infections in Stool Samples from Tertiary Care Hospital of Rural Setting

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Authors

Nitasha Kumari
M.Sc. Student, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
Ritu Garg
Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
Varsha A. Singh
Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India
Ashma Khatun
M.Sc. Student, Department of Microbiology, Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, MMDU, Mullana, Ambala (Haryana), India

Abstract


Background: Parasitic infections are the major public concern particularly in developing countries like India. Routinely used microscopy method for the detection of parasitic infections have compromised sensitivity. Materials and Method: The study was carried out on 500 stool samples received in Department of Microbiology MMIMSR, Mullana (Haryana) for a period of 6 months (August 2017 to January 2018). Stool samples for detection of ova and cyst were included. Result: Of these 500 samples examined, 235 (47%) stool samples showed positive results for ova/cyst after the use of simple salt floatation technique while it was merely 33% (n-165) without using the salt floatation method. of the 235 positive samples 29.8% were cyst of Giardia lamblia followed by eggs of Ascarislumbricoides (Fertilized and unfertilized) and cyst of Entamoebahistolytica each of 19.1%, Ancylostomaduodenale 14.9%, Hymenolepis nana 10.6%, Entamoeba coli 4.2% and Trichuristrichiura 2.1% were also identified. Conclusion: There is a need for more tests that do not sacrifice sensitivity and that can be used in poor resource field settings.

Keywords


Parasitic infection diagnosis, Ova/cyst, stool samples.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v11%2Fi2%2F2020%2Fijphrd%2F194916