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Indigenous Healing Practices and Beneficiaries’ Perception


Affiliations
1 Research Scholar, Department of Social Work, Central University of Kerala, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala, India
     

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Context: For centuries, the concept of indigenous healing has been regarded as a non-invasive medical practice, and despite the development of clinical treatments, many people still depend on it for mental health. It is estimated that in developing countries, 80% of the population living in rural areas depend on indigenous healers for their healthcare needs (WHO, 2001). Despite the establishment of modern hospitals and educational institutions, people from the southern region of Karnataka believe that unnatural occurrences are due to Bhootas (Spirits) and a certain portion of the population attribute mental illness to witchcraft and supernatural causes. In order to overcome these obstacles,people approach healers for a miracle solution. Acknowledging the significant role of the belief system of people seeking the help of traditional healers for various problems, the present study was conducted to understand the perception of the beneficiaries regarding indigenous healing. Based on the findings, the study concluded that the belief system remains prominent in every aspect of the life of individuals who seek the help of healers, while indigenous healers need to be trained in order to provide better mental healthcare to the patients.

Keywords

Mental Illness, Traditional Healers, Beliefs, Beneficiaries, and Patris.
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  • Indigenous Healing Practices and Beneficiaries’ Perception

Abstract Views: 54  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Prakasha Amin
Research Scholar, Department of Social Work, Central University of Kerala, India
Mohan A. K.
Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala, India

Abstract


Context: For centuries, the concept of indigenous healing has been regarded as a non-invasive medical practice, and despite the development of clinical treatments, many people still depend on it for mental health. It is estimated that in developing countries, 80% of the population living in rural areas depend on indigenous healers for their healthcare needs (WHO, 2001). Despite the establishment of modern hospitals and educational institutions, people from the southern region of Karnataka believe that unnatural occurrences are due to Bhootas (Spirits) and a certain portion of the population attribute mental illness to witchcraft and supernatural causes. In order to overcome these obstacles,people approach healers for a miracle solution. Acknowledging the significant role of the belief system of people seeking the help of traditional healers for various problems, the present study was conducted to understand the perception of the beneficiaries regarding indigenous healing. Based on the findings, the study concluded that the belief system remains prominent in every aspect of the life of individuals who seek the help of healers, while indigenous healers need to be trained in order to provide better mental healthcare to the patients.

Keywords


Mental Illness, Traditional Healers, Beliefs, Beneficiaries, and Patris.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v11%2Fi2%2F2020%2Fijphrd%2F194826