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Clinico-Mycological Profile of Dermatophytosis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India


Affiliations
1 PhD Scholar, Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugarm, India
2 Professor and Head, Dr. Baba Saheb Ambedkar Medical College & Hospital Rohini, Delhi, India
3 Emeritus Prof., Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugram, India
4 Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, MMC, Muzaffarnagar, India
5 Ex Professor, Department of Microbiology, MMC, Muzaffarnagar, India
6 Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugram, India
     

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Introduction: Dermatophytosiscomprise approximately 15-75 % of all the mycological infections. It is common in tropical and subtropical countries including India where high temperature and humidity play an important role in the pathogenesis. Dermatophytes are closely related keratinolytic fungi with the ability to degrade keratin and invade the skin, hair and nails causing dermatophytosis.

Objective: To find out the distribution of various dermatophytefungi responsible for the different clinical types of dermatophyte infections. Methods: KOH mount were prepared from the skin scrapings, nail clippings, and hair bits to look for fungal elements. The specimens were also inoculated on Mycosal media and Sabourauds dextrose agar with chloramphenicol. The dermatophytes were identified on the basis of colony characteristics, lactophenol cotton blue mount, nutritional requirement, temperature tolerance, urease production, and in vitro hair perforation test.

Result: A total of 245 patients were included in the study. Tinea corporis was most common clinical type with 102(41.6%) cases followed by T. facei [15 (6.1%)]. T. corporis + T. cruris [88(35.9%)] was most common mixed clinical type. Out of 245 patients, fungal hyphae were seen in 162(66.1%) samples and the rest 83(33.9%) were negative by KOH mount. In the 162 KOH positive samples, 151(91.5%) samples were culture positive and 11(13.7%) were culture negative. In 83(58.9%) KOH negative samples, 14(8.5%) were culture positive and rest 69(86.3%) were culture negative. A total of 165 samples were culture positive, of which T. mentagraphytes was isolated in 153(92.7%) followed by T. rubrum in 5(3.03%), T. violaceum in 3(1.8%), T. tonsurans in 2(1.2%) and M. canis in 2(1.2%) samples.


Keywords

Dermatophytosis, Fungal Culture, Mycosal Media, Taenia corporis, Trichophyton, Microsporum.
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  • Clinico-Mycological Profile of Dermatophytosis in a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

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Authors

Sachin Sharma
PhD Scholar, Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugarm, India
Megha Maheshwari
Professor and Head, Dr. Baba Saheb Ambedkar Medical College & Hospital Rohini, Delhi, India
Shobha Broor
Emeritus Prof., Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugram, India
Paramjit Singh
Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, MMC, Muzaffarnagar, India
Rameshwari Thakur
Ex Professor, Department of Microbiology, MMC, Muzaffarnagar, India
Anita Chakravarti
Professor and Head, Department of Microbiology, SGT Deemed to be University, Gurugram, India

Abstract


Introduction: Dermatophytosiscomprise approximately 15-75 % of all the mycological infections. It is common in tropical and subtropical countries including India where high temperature and humidity play an important role in the pathogenesis. Dermatophytes are closely related keratinolytic fungi with the ability to degrade keratin and invade the skin, hair and nails causing dermatophytosis.

Objective: To find out the distribution of various dermatophytefungi responsible for the different clinical types of dermatophyte infections. Methods: KOH mount were prepared from the skin scrapings, nail clippings, and hair bits to look for fungal elements. The specimens were also inoculated on Mycosal media and Sabourauds dextrose agar with chloramphenicol. The dermatophytes were identified on the basis of colony characteristics, lactophenol cotton blue mount, nutritional requirement, temperature tolerance, urease production, and in vitro hair perforation test.

Result: A total of 245 patients were included in the study. Tinea corporis was most common clinical type with 102(41.6%) cases followed by T. facei [15 (6.1%)]. T. corporis + T. cruris [88(35.9%)] was most common mixed clinical type. Out of 245 patients, fungal hyphae were seen in 162(66.1%) samples and the rest 83(33.9%) were negative by KOH mount. In the 162 KOH positive samples, 151(91.5%) samples were culture positive and 11(13.7%) were culture negative. In 83(58.9%) KOH negative samples, 14(8.5%) were culture positive and rest 69(86.3%) were culture negative. A total of 165 samples were culture positive, of which T. mentagraphytes was isolated in 153(92.7%) followed by T. rubrum in 5(3.03%), T. violaceum in 3(1.8%), T. tonsurans in 2(1.2%) and M. canis in 2(1.2%) samples.


Keywords


Dermatophytosis, Fungal Culture, Mycosal Media, Taenia corporis, Trichophyton, Microsporum.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v11%2Fi1%2F2020%2Fijphrd%2F193924