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Evaluation of Lung Function in Automobile Diesel Mechanics in a Semi Urban Town of South India-Kumbakonam Urban Rural Epidemiological Study–KURES 6


Affiliations
1 Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Biosciences, Sastra University, Thanjavur, India
2 Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Puducherry, India
3 Associate Professor, Department of General Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute., Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Puducherry, India
     

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Automobile mechanics are constantly exposed to dust from the exhausts of petrol and diesel. We recruited 50 petrol two wheeler mechanics and subjected them to lung function tests. All were non-smokers without any respiratory symptoms. All mechanics were regular workers with a minimum of three years and at least an exposure of 5 hours of more per day. They were explained about the methodology and asked to attempt three times and the best of three were selected. The incidence of obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC<70%) was only 2%. But the incidence of reduction of effort independent MEF 25-75 in a significant manner is around 38% which coincided with reduction in PEFR values. ⁅FEV1 = Forced expiratory volume in 1 second. PEFR = peak expiratory flow rate. MEF ( 25-75) = mean forced expiratory flow between the 25% and 75% of the FVC.] We did not find any correlation with body mass index. We did not resort to analyses of deterioration of lung function with differing exposure years with a low sample size. We suggest that a regular PEFR with practice of established preventive measures may prevent the progress from asymptomatic illness to a symptomatic stage in such health workers.

Keywords

Spirometry, Lung Function, Automobile, Mechanics.
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  • Evaluation of Lung Function in Automobile Diesel Mechanics in a Semi Urban Town of South India-Kumbakonam Urban Rural Epidemiological Study–KURES 6

Abstract Views: 40  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

M. R. Suchitra
Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Biosciences, Sastra University, Thanjavur, India
S. Parthasarathy
Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Puducherry, India
Mohamed Hanifa
Associate Professor, Department of General Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute., Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Puducherry, India

Abstract


Automobile mechanics are constantly exposed to dust from the exhausts of petrol and diesel. We recruited 50 petrol two wheeler mechanics and subjected them to lung function tests. All were non-smokers without any respiratory symptoms. All mechanics were regular workers with a minimum of three years and at least an exposure of 5 hours of more per day. They were explained about the methodology and asked to attempt three times and the best of three were selected. The incidence of obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC<70%) was only 2%. But the incidence of reduction of effort independent MEF 25-75 in a significant manner is around 38% which coincided with reduction in PEFR values. ⁅FEV1 = Forced expiratory volume in 1 second. PEFR = peak expiratory flow rate. MEF ( 25-75) = mean forced expiratory flow between the 25% and 75% of the FVC.] We did not find any correlation with body mass index. We did not resort to analyses of deterioration of lung function with differing exposure years with a low sample size. We suggest that a regular PEFR with practice of established preventive measures may prevent the progress from asymptomatic illness to a symptomatic stage in such health workers.

Keywords


Spirometry, Lung Function, Automobile, Mechanics.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v11%2Fi1%2F2020%2Fijphrd%2F193880