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Skills Laboratory Implementation Readiness and Associated Students Clinical Performance on Neonatal Resuscitation: A Cross-Sectional Study among Diploma Nursing Schools in Tanzania


Affiliations
1 College of Health and Allied Sciences,The University of Dodoma, Tanzania, United Republic of
2 Dodoma, Tanzania, United Republic of
     

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Background: Skills laboratory is one of the most important components in nursing education as it bridges the gap between theory and practice among nursing students.

Objective: Assessment of skills laboratory implementation readiness and associated student’s clinical performance on neonatal resuscitation among diploma nursing schools in Tanzania.

Methodology: The study employed quantitative approach, the study design was cross-sectional. The sample size was 384 students from four regions including; Dodoma, Manyara, Morogoro and Mbeya. Multistage sampling was used to select zones, regions, and district; while proportional sampling and simple random sampling were used to select students in respective schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire, standardized checklist and OSPE checklist and analyzed by statistical packaged for social sciences (SPSS).

Result: The study had 384 participants’ with 56.0% female and 46% male participants. Findings show that 55.6% school had inadequate requirement in terms of furniture, models and infection control requirements. 71.1% of the respondents had good performance on neonatal resuscitation with the mean score of 60.3 %. 60.9% had positive perception toward the use of skills laboratory, and it was found that there is association between SLIR and student clinical performance on neonatal resuscitation with (OR=3.822, CI: 2.306 -6.333, P= 0.000) and (AOR= 0.260, CI: 0.119-0.337, P= 0.001).

Conclusion: Most of nursing schools had limited requirements for skill laboratory implementation. The ministry of health training department should ensure that all government and non-government nursing institutions abide to the requirement set that they should have a well- equipped skills laboratory that will impact on students’ performance.


Keywords

Skills Laboratory, Readiness, Implementation, Clinical Performance.
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  • Skills Laboratory Implementation Readiness and Associated Students Clinical Performance on Neonatal Resuscitation: A Cross-Sectional Study among Diploma Nursing Schools in Tanzania

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Authors

Dafrosa Herman Haule
College of Health and Allied Sciences,The University of Dodoma, Tanzania, United Republic of
Stephen M. Kibusi
Dodoma, Tanzania, United Republic of
Secilia Kapalata Ng’weshemi
Dodoma, Tanzania, United Republic of

Abstract


Background: Skills laboratory is one of the most important components in nursing education as it bridges the gap between theory and practice among nursing students.

Objective: Assessment of skills laboratory implementation readiness and associated student’s clinical performance on neonatal resuscitation among diploma nursing schools in Tanzania.

Methodology: The study employed quantitative approach, the study design was cross-sectional. The sample size was 384 students from four regions including; Dodoma, Manyara, Morogoro and Mbeya. Multistage sampling was used to select zones, regions, and district; while proportional sampling and simple random sampling were used to select students in respective schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire, standardized checklist and OSPE checklist and analyzed by statistical packaged for social sciences (SPSS).

Result: The study had 384 participants’ with 56.0% female and 46% male participants. Findings show that 55.6% school had inadequate requirement in terms of furniture, models and infection control requirements. 71.1% of the respondents had good performance on neonatal resuscitation with the mean score of 60.3 %. 60.9% had positive perception toward the use of skills laboratory, and it was found that there is association between SLIR and student clinical performance on neonatal resuscitation with (OR=3.822, CI: 2.306 -6.333, P= 0.000) and (AOR= 0.260, CI: 0.119-0.337, P= 0.001).

Conclusion: Most of nursing schools had limited requirements for skill laboratory implementation. The ministry of health training department should ensure that all government and non-government nursing institutions abide to the requirement set that they should have a well- equipped skills laboratory that will impact on students’ performance.


Keywords


Skills Laboratory, Readiness, Implementation, Clinical Performance.

References