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Flipped Classroom Learning Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students in Advanced Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Midwifery Course


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1 Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
     

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Background: Flipped classroom is designed as an educational innovation in order to enhance student’s critical thinking and problem-solving skill. It comprises in-class and out-of-class learning activities.

Purpose: To describe students’ learning experiences of the flipped classroom activities, supporting learning environments and barriers to learning out comes.

Methodology: Descriptive qualitative research was employed. Participants were seven first year graduate nursing students enrolled in the Advanced Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Midwifery course. Three main active learning activities were: 1) participating in before class activities, 2) Practicing in class activities, and 3) checking understanding and extending after class learning outcomes.

Results: Students who learned using a flipped classroom approach had positive experiences, achieved learning outcomes, and were satisfied with case analysis activities. Supporting learning environments were appropriate handouts, adequacy of learning materials, active involvement, interesting case study, and prior knowledge and experiences. Learning barriers were too much class work and activities in all courses and printed documents in English language.

Conclusion: The flipped classroom was effective to enhance students’ competencies in application of theoretical knowledge, critical thinking, and problem solving skill. It should be utilized in nursing education with a well-designed and well-prepared scheme to flip the class in appropriate courses.


Keywords

Flipped Classroom, Active Learning, Graduate Nursing Students.
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  • Flipped Classroom Learning Experiences of Graduate Nursing Students in Advanced Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Midwifery Course

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Authors

Sununta Youngwanichsetha
Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
Sureeporn Kritcharoen
Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
Sopen Chunuan
Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
Sasikarn Kala
Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand
Sasitorn Phumdoung
Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand

Abstract


Background: Flipped classroom is designed as an educational innovation in order to enhance student’s critical thinking and problem-solving skill. It comprises in-class and out-of-class learning activities.

Purpose: To describe students’ learning experiences of the flipped classroom activities, supporting learning environments and barriers to learning out comes.

Methodology: Descriptive qualitative research was employed. Participants were seven first year graduate nursing students enrolled in the Advanced Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Midwifery course. Three main active learning activities were: 1) participating in before class activities, 2) Practicing in class activities, and 3) checking understanding and extending after class learning outcomes.

Results: Students who learned using a flipped classroom approach had positive experiences, achieved learning outcomes, and were satisfied with case analysis activities. Supporting learning environments were appropriate handouts, adequacy of learning materials, active involvement, interesting case study, and prior knowledge and experiences. Learning barriers were too much class work and activities in all courses and printed documents in English language.

Conclusion: The flipped classroom was effective to enhance students’ competencies in application of theoretical knowledge, critical thinking, and problem solving skill. It should be utilized in nursing education with a well-designed and well-prepared scheme to flip the class in appropriate courses.


Keywords


Flipped Classroom, Active Learning, Graduate Nursing Students.

References