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Managing Grief on a Maternity Unit


Affiliations
1 York College, City University of New York 94-20 Guy R. Brewer Blvd., Science 110 Jamaica
2 SUNY Downstate University of New York Dowstate School of Nursing 450 Clarkson Avenue Brooklyn
     

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Maternal grief is an often unfecognized and unmanaged health problem that can result in long-term consequences for the parents, other family members and future children. This article uses a case study approach to explore this issue and develop realistic strategies for successful resolution. Specific shortand long-term strategies are discussed.

Keywords

Anticipatory Grief, Uncomplicated Grief, Complicated or Prolonged Grief, Grief Manifestations, Grief Stages, Short-term Management, Long-term Strategies
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  • Managing Grief on a Maternity Unit

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Authors

Joanne Lavin
York College, City University of New York 94-20 Guy R. Brewer Blvd., Science 110 Jamaica
Maria Rosario-Sim
SUNY Downstate University of New York Dowstate School of Nursing 450 Clarkson Avenue Brooklyn

Abstract


Maternal grief is an often unfecognized and unmanaged health problem that can result in long-term consequences for the parents, other family members and future children. This article uses a case study approach to explore this issue and develop realistic strategies for successful resolution. Specific shortand long-term strategies are discussed.

Keywords


Anticipatory Grief, Uncomplicated Grief, Complicated or Prolonged Grief, Grief Manifestations, Grief Stages, Short-term Management, Long-term Strategies

References