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Detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Market-Ready Chickens in Zambia


Affiliations
1 Lusaka City Council, Public Health Department, P.O. Box 30789, Lusaka, Zambia
2 Microbiology Unit, Paraclinical Studies, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 32379, Lusaka, Zambia
3 Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania, United Republic of
4 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 65001, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of
5 Division of Bioresources, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Kita-20, Nishi-10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan
 

The frequent administering of antibiotics in the treatment of poultry diseases may contribute to emergence of antimicrobialresistant strains. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of extended-spectrum α-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing Escherichia coli in poultry in Zambia. A total of 384 poultry samples were collected and analyzed for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.The cultured E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of blaCTX-M, blaSHV, and blaTEM genes. Overall 20.1%, 77/384, (95% CI; 43.2-65.5%) of total samples analyzed contained ESBLproducing Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial sensitivity test revealed that 85.7% (66/77; CI: 75.7-92) of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates conferred resistance to beta-lactamand other antimicrobial agents.These results indicate that poultry is a potential reservoir for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.The presence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in poultry destined for human consumption requires strengthening of the antibiotic administering policy. This is important as antibiotic administration in food animals is gaining momentum for improved animal productivity in developing countries such as Zambia.
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  • Detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Market-Ready Chickens in Zambia

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Authors

K. Chishimba
Lusaka City Council, Public Health Department, P.O. Box 30789, Lusaka, Zambia
B. M. Hang’ombe
Microbiology Unit, Paraclinical Studies, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 32379, Lusaka, Zambia
K. Muzandu
Microbiology Unit, Paraclinical Studies, University of Zambia, P.O. Box 32379, Lusaka, Zambia
S. E. Mshana
Weill Bugando School of Medicine, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania, United Republic of
M. I. Matee
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, P.O. Box 65001, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of
C. Nakajima
Division of Bioresources, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Kita-20, Nishi-10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan
Y. Suzuki
Division of Bioresources, Hokkaido University Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Kita-20, Nishi-10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan

Abstract


The frequent administering of antibiotics in the treatment of poultry diseases may contribute to emergence of antimicrobialresistant strains. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of extended-spectrum α-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing Escherichia coli in poultry in Zambia. A total of 384 poultry samples were collected and analyzed for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.The cultured E. coli isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests and the polymerase chain reaction for detection of blaCTX-M, blaSHV, and blaTEM genes. Overall 20.1%, 77/384, (95% CI; 43.2-65.5%) of total samples analyzed contained ESBLproducing Escherichia coli. The antimicrobial sensitivity test revealed that 85.7% (66/77; CI: 75.7-92) of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates conferred resistance to beta-lactamand other antimicrobial agents.These results indicate that poultry is a potential reservoir for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.The presence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in poultry destined for human consumption requires strengthening of the antibiotic administering policy. This is important as antibiotic administration in food animals is gaining momentum for improved animal productivity in developing countries such as Zambia.