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An Exploration of Academic Leadership Dynamics:A Literature Review


Affiliations
1 Oman College of Management & Technology, Oman
2 Uttaranchal University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
     

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India is the second most populous country in the world, with over 133.92 crores people (2017), more than a sixth of the world’s population. Already containing 17.5% of the world’s population, India is projected to be the world’s most populous country by 2022, surpassing China, its population reaching 1.6 billion by 2050. Its population growth rate is 1.7%, ranking 95th in the world in 2017. India has more than 45% of its population below the age of 25 years. There is solid evidence from all over the country for this increasing appetite for education across all social groups and across all income groups. Academic leadership is the one who can fulfil this appetite of the masses. Present research work tries to analyse the dynamics of academic leadership in the country and focus on essential traits required for academic leadership for fulfilling the long term observe of the nation. The study conducted based upon the data collected from the literatures and from other multiple secondary sources of evidence. The study signifies that academic leadership has become larger and more central for the development of qualities of higher education in the country. Universities need to be consciously and explicitly managing the processes associated with the creation of academic leadership with their knowledge assets and to recognise the value of their intellectual capital to their continuing role in society and in a wider global marketplace for higher education.

Keywords

Academic Leadership, Higher Education, Global Marketplace, Intellectual Capital, Leadership Traits, etc.
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  • An Exploration of Academic Leadership Dynamics:A Literature Review

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Authors

S. M. Tariq Zafar
Oman College of Management & Technology, Oman
Waleed Hmedat
Oman College of Management & Technology, Oman
D. S. Chaubey
Uttaranchal University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Abdul Rehman
Oman College of Management & Technology, Oman

Abstract


India is the second most populous country in the world, with over 133.92 crores people (2017), more than a sixth of the world’s population. Already containing 17.5% of the world’s population, India is projected to be the world’s most populous country by 2022, surpassing China, its population reaching 1.6 billion by 2050. Its population growth rate is 1.7%, ranking 95th in the world in 2017. India has more than 45% of its population below the age of 25 years. There is solid evidence from all over the country for this increasing appetite for education across all social groups and across all income groups. Academic leadership is the one who can fulfil this appetite of the masses. Present research work tries to analyse the dynamics of academic leadership in the country and focus on essential traits required for academic leadership for fulfilling the long term observe of the nation. The study conducted based upon the data collected from the literatures and from other multiple secondary sources of evidence. The study signifies that academic leadership has become larger and more central for the development of qualities of higher education in the country. Universities need to be consciously and explicitly managing the processes associated with the creation of academic leadership with their knowledge assets and to recognise the value of their intellectual capital to their continuing role in society and in a wider global marketplace for higher education.

Keywords


Academic Leadership, Higher Education, Global Marketplace, Intellectual Capital, Leadership Traits, etc.

References