Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Social And Emotional Skills as Scaffold for Mental Well-Being of Children and Adolescents: A Construct


Affiliations
1 Department of Human Development and Family Empowerment, Bharati College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Social and emotional competencies learnt during early childhood years have proven to be of utmost importance in enhancing social relationships, conflict resolution, and academic success during early years. Research in the domain has found significant positive relationship between social and emotional skills in children and mental well-being. Children who acquire these competencies are able to handle conflict and challenges in an amicable manner. During adolescent years studies have conclusively indicated the positive role of emotional regulation in healthy identity formation and mental health. Coupled with this are the benefits of better school adjustment, social interactions and school related success. Depression and anxiety witnessed during adolescent and early adulthood years can to a large extent be prevented by the school based programmes. Adolescents, as it is are in a very vulnerable state to mental health related challenges. School settings are ideal to promote social and emotional well-being of all the children thus helping to reduce the incidence of social emotional and behavioural problems during later years. The paper explores the role of social and emotional competencies which can benefit a child and adolescent in social adjustment and prevent psychopathology during childhood and adolescent years. The preventive approach can be of significant relevance in terms of potential to reduce the mental health burden and promote better mental health.

Keywords

Social And Emotional Skills, Mental Wellbeing, Adolescents.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Changing a Child's mind (2012, August 2). Scientific American Mind 23, pp. 46-47.
  • Chen, X. (2008). Children's competence in cultural context. Annual Review of Psychology, 59, 591-616.
  • Child Behaviour Checklist-Wikipedia (2015, November 16). Retrieved from https://.porticonetwork.ca.
  • Cole, M., & Wertsch, J. V . (1996). Beyond the individual-social antinomy in discussions of Piaget and V ygotsky. Human Development, 39(5), 250–256.
  • Crick, N. (2002). Nobody told me There'd friends like these. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, December , 30(6), 599-560.
  • Empathy (2015, may 18). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia/org/wiki/empathy.
  • Fabes, R. M. (2001). The role of sex of persand gender typed activities in young children's peer affiliative networks: A longitudinal analysis of selection and influence. Child Development, 84(3), 921-937.
  • Fantuzzo, J., & McWayne, C. (2002). The relationship between peer play interaction in the family context and dimensions of school readiness for low income preschool children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 94(1), 79-87.
  • Fantuzzo, J., Grim, S., & Hazen, H. (2005, June 06). Project start: An evaluation of a community wide-school-based intervention to reduce truancy . Retrieved from onlinelibrary.wiley.com: https://doi.org/10.1002/pits.20103
  • Garmezy, N. M. (1984). The study of stress and competence in children: A building block for developmental psychopathology. Child Development, 55, 97-111.
  • Hartup, W. (1992). Having friends, making friends and keeping friends: Mrelationships as educational contexts. Retrieved from ERIC Digest: ERIC clearinghouse on Elementary and early Childhood Education.ED 345854
  • IV , D. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. Washington D.C.
  • Jha, D. N. (2019, December 24). One in every seven people suffers from mental disorder. New Delhi, India: Times of India.
  • Olweus, D. (1993). Bully at school: What we know and what we can do. Psychology in the School, 40(6), 140.
  • Preventing Mental, Emotional & Behavioral Disorders among Young People. Progress & Possibilities (2009). Retrieved from https://www.nap.edu/resources12480.
  • Raver, C., & Knitzer, J. (2002, January). Ready to enter: What research tells policy makers about strategies to promote social and emotional school readiness among three-and four-year olds. Retrieved from researchgate.net: researchgate.net/ publication/5091232
  • Rekha, S. (2015). Intervention strategies to enhance social emotional competence of children. New Delhi: unpublished research document.
  • Research summary: Resilience & At-risk Children & Youth (2013, April). Retrieved from center.serve.org/nche/downloads/resilience.pdf.
  • Sapra, R. (2011). Storytelling to enhance social and emotional skills: An Indian Pesspective. New Delhi, India: Vishwabharati Publication.
  • Sapra, R. (2019). Social and emotional well-being of children: Facilitating role of Bibliotherapy. International Journal of Science and Research, 8(10), 814-822. www.ijsr.net, 10.21275/ART20201897.
  • Shonkoff, J. D. (2000). From neurons to neighbourhoods: The science of early childhood development. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/catalog/9824.html.
  • Webster, Stratton, & Carolyn (2005). The incredible years: A training series for the prevention and treatment of conduct problems in young children. In E. Hibbs and P . S. Jenson (Eds.), Psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent disorders: Empirically based strategies for clinical practice (pp. 507-555). American Psychological association.
  • Why training Teachers in social and Emotional Learningis just as important as ABC's. (retrieved 2018, May 05). Retrieved from https://www.newameica.org/educationpolicy/edcentral.
  • www.mentalhealth.orguk (Retrieved 2019, september 12). Retrieved from www.mentalhealth.orguk/sites/default/files/impactspirituality.pdf2006.

Abstract Views: 84

PDF Views: 0




  • Social And Emotional Skills as Scaffold for Mental Well-Being of Children and Adolescents: A Construct

Abstract Views: 84  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Rekha Sapra
Department of Human Development and Family Empowerment, Bharati College, University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Abstract


Social and emotional competencies learnt during early childhood years have proven to be of utmost importance in enhancing social relationships, conflict resolution, and academic success during early years. Research in the domain has found significant positive relationship between social and emotional skills in children and mental well-being. Children who acquire these competencies are able to handle conflict and challenges in an amicable manner. During adolescent years studies have conclusively indicated the positive role of emotional regulation in healthy identity formation and mental health. Coupled with this are the benefits of better school adjustment, social interactions and school related success. Depression and anxiety witnessed during adolescent and early adulthood years can to a large extent be prevented by the school based programmes. Adolescents, as it is are in a very vulnerable state to mental health related challenges. School settings are ideal to promote social and emotional well-being of all the children thus helping to reduce the incidence of social emotional and behavioural problems during later years. The paper explores the role of social and emotional competencies which can benefit a child and adolescent in social adjustment and prevent psychopathology during childhood and adolescent years. The preventive approach can be of significant relevance in terms of potential to reduce the mental health burden and promote better mental health.

Keywords


Social And Emotional Skills, Mental Wellbeing, Adolescents.

References