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Role of Faith on Self-Esteem of Young Christian Women Involved in Multiple Roles


Affiliations
1 Department of Counselling Psychology University ofMadras, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Psychology (Counselling) Sampuma Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
     

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As individuals, we have different belief systems. One such belief system is our religious faith. Religious faith helps in coping up with stress. The increasing demands for women to fulfil multiple roles lead to stress which often lowers their self-esteem. Self-esteem is one of the important components of emotional well-being. To examine the relationship between faith and self-esteem among young Christian women involved in multiple roles. An Ex-post Facto study was used. 60 employed and married Christian women in Bangalore, India. Participants completed Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (Plante & Boccaccini, 1997) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965). Data was analyzed using Pearson's product-moment correlation test. Self-esteem was positively correlated to faith of young Christian women involved in multiple roles (p<0.10; r = .181) indicating that women who scored high on strength of Faith tend to score high on Self-esteem. Findings hold implications for working women, their families, mental health professionals and church leaders. The results also allude to the benefits of enabling and empowering women in church settings and conferences for understanding the role ofFaith on Selfesteem and thus foster healthier emotional well-being.

Keywords

Faith, Self-Esteem, Young Christian Women, Multiple Roles.
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  • Role of Faith on Self-Esteem of Young Christian Women Involved in Multiple Roles

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Authors

Sherin Lee Thomas
Department of Counselling Psychology University ofMadras, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Vinod Victor
Department of Psychology (Counselling) Sampuma Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Abstract


As individuals, we have different belief systems. One such belief system is our religious faith. Religious faith helps in coping up with stress. The increasing demands for women to fulfil multiple roles lead to stress which often lowers their self-esteem. Self-esteem is one of the important components of emotional well-being. To examine the relationship between faith and self-esteem among young Christian women involved in multiple roles. An Ex-post Facto study was used. 60 employed and married Christian women in Bangalore, India. Participants completed Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire (Plante & Boccaccini, 1997) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965). Data was analyzed using Pearson's product-moment correlation test. Self-esteem was positively correlated to faith of young Christian women involved in multiple roles (p<0.10; r = .181) indicating that women who scored high on strength of Faith tend to score high on Self-esteem. Findings hold implications for working women, their families, mental health professionals and church leaders. The results also allude to the benefits of enabling and empowering women in church settings and conferences for understanding the role ofFaith on Selfesteem and thus foster healthier emotional well-being.

Keywords


Faith, Self-Esteem, Young Christian Women, Multiple Roles.

References