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Teachers' Awareness of Students with Learning Disabilities:The Case of Selected Primary Schools of Wollega Zones


Affiliations
1 Department of Behavioral Science, College of Education and Behavioral Science Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
     

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This study assessed the existence o f students with learning disabilities in primary schools and teachers were aware of their existence. The study employed exploratory research design. 210 teachers were drawn out o f465 teachers from four primary schools which are selected randomly (i.e., from four Wollega Zones). Questionnaires, classroom observation guide, interview schedules, and documentary review checklist were used to collect data. The collected data were analyzed thematically. The descriptive statistics used involved frequencies, means, charts, and tables. The finding showed 8% of students in these primary schools show learning disabilities characteristics even though little teachers were conscious of their presence and how to provide appropriate instruction for their learning. This showed that, most teachers focus on visible disabilities and these students were not receiving appropriate type intervention. Finally, based on the findings, it was suggested that, awareness raising activities should be designed to the school principals, teachers so that they could support and encourage students with learning disability.

Keywords

Attitude, Learning Disabilities and Teachers.
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  • Teachers' Awareness of Students with Learning Disabilities:The Case of Selected Primary Schools of Wollega Zones

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Authors

Dinka Yadeta Oli
Department of Behavioral Science, College of Education and Behavioral Science Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia

Abstract


This study assessed the existence o f students with learning disabilities in primary schools and teachers were aware of their existence. The study employed exploratory research design. 210 teachers were drawn out o f465 teachers from four primary schools which are selected randomly (i.e., from four Wollega Zones). Questionnaires, classroom observation guide, interview schedules, and documentary review checklist were used to collect data. The collected data were analyzed thematically. The descriptive statistics used involved frequencies, means, charts, and tables. The finding showed 8% of students in these primary schools show learning disabilities characteristics even though little teachers were conscious of their presence and how to provide appropriate instruction for their learning. This showed that, most teachers focus on visible disabilities and these students were not receiving appropriate type intervention. Finally, based on the findings, it was suggested that, awareness raising activities should be designed to the school principals, teachers so that they could support and encourage students with learning disability.

Keywords


Attitude, Learning Disabilities and Teachers.

References