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A Comparative Study of Percieved Social Support in Relation to Psychological Well-Being in Post-Maternity Working Women


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, North Campus, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
2 Zakir Hussain Delhi College University of Delhi, Delhi, India
     

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Research suggests that growing pressure on working mothers both external and internal contributes to a feeling of intolerable stress. The pressure comes from the media and society, but mostly it comes trom person's own selves. More working mothers than ever are trapped in an endless cycle of guilt: feeling they are bad mothers because they work and bad employees because they have a family. The children are inevitably affected in return atfecting the well-being of working women post maternity who perceive least support trom significant others or family/ triends. Therefore, it is necessary to focus on the psychological well-being and perceived social support among working women post maternity. Psychological well-being is influenced by life events, personality characteristics, personal goals, perceived social support, the type of attribution one makes. The results depict that there is no significant etfect of perceived social support on the psychological well-being of the post maternity women.

Keywords

Post Maternity, Women, Psychological Wellbeing, Perceived Social Support, Family, Working Mothers.
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  • A Comparative Study of Percieved Social Support in Relation to Psychological Well-Being in Post-Maternity Working Women

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Authors

Jyotsna Singh
Department of Psychology, North Campus, University of Delhi, Delhi, India
Khurshid Alam
Zakir Hussain Delhi College University of Delhi, Delhi, India

Abstract


Research suggests that growing pressure on working mothers both external and internal contributes to a feeling of intolerable stress. The pressure comes from the media and society, but mostly it comes trom person's own selves. More working mothers than ever are trapped in an endless cycle of guilt: feeling they are bad mothers because they work and bad employees because they have a family. The children are inevitably affected in return atfecting the well-being of working women post maternity who perceive least support trom significant others or family/ triends. Therefore, it is necessary to focus on the psychological well-being and perceived social support among working women post maternity. Psychological well-being is influenced by life events, personality characteristics, personal goals, perceived social support, the type of attribution one makes. The results depict that there is no significant etfect of perceived social support on the psychological well-being of the post maternity women.

Keywords


Post Maternity, Women, Psychological Wellbeing, Perceived Social Support, Family, Working Mothers.

References