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Assessment and Management of Negative Mood States among Males with Substance Dependence


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1 Department of Psychology, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Galgotias University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
     

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The country is flooded with substances that lift you up, cool you down and turn you upside down. The cost of money and emotional turmoil has made the issue of substance abuse a major concern worldwide. This research was also an attempt to assess and manage such emotional turmoils (negative mood states) among males with substance dependence. Objectives were to develop an assessment tool, to develop an intervention program and to study its etfect on negative mood states. Here negative mood states were anxiety, depression, guilt and anger while intervention program included yoga therapy, relaxation therapy, adaptive skills training and psycho education. Four directional hypotheses were formulated to analyze the effect of intervention program on negative mood states. Negative mood states were assessed by mood states questionnaire developed by the researcher. 100 male subjects trom 16 to 60 years of age having multiple substance dependence were selected through purposive sampling. Prepost control group design was used to collect data and the data for four hypotheses was analyzed by using t- test. Results showed that three hypotheses were accepted at 0.01 level of significance except one related to guilt. This research is significant in providing a new negative mood states assessment tool, a new intervention program for managing negative mood states and preparing subjects for relapse prevention after treatment.

Keywords

Negative Mood States, Substance Dependence, Intervention Program, Relapse Prevention.
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  • Assessment and Management of Negative Mood States among Males with Substance Dependence

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Authors

Neha Sharma
Department of Psychology, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Galgotias University, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


The country is flooded with substances that lift you up, cool you down and turn you upside down. The cost of money and emotional turmoil has made the issue of substance abuse a major concern worldwide. This research was also an attempt to assess and manage such emotional turmoils (negative mood states) among males with substance dependence. Objectives were to develop an assessment tool, to develop an intervention program and to study its etfect on negative mood states. Here negative mood states were anxiety, depression, guilt and anger while intervention program included yoga therapy, relaxation therapy, adaptive skills training and psycho education. Four directional hypotheses were formulated to analyze the effect of intervention program on negative mood states. Negative mood states were assessed by mood states questionnaire developed by the researcher. 100 male subjects trom 16 to 60 years of age having multiple substance dependence were selected through purposive sampling. Prepost control group design was used to collect data and the data for four hypotheses was analyzed by using t- test. Results showed that three hypotheses were accepted at 0.01 level of significance except one related to guilt. This research is significant in providing a new negative mood states assessment tool, a new intervention program for managing negative mood states and preparing subjects for relapse prevention after treatment.

Keywords


Negative Mood States, Substance Dependence, Intervention Program, Relapse Prevention.

References