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International Terrorism and Television:An Analytical Discourse Based on Media Regulation on Coverage of Terrorism in Pre and Post 9/11 Scenario


Affiliations
1 Amity School of Communication, Amity University, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Amity Institute of Psychology and Allied Sciences, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Dept. of Communication, Idaho State University, Idaho, United States
     

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There are numerous parameters that have to be taken into consideration when considering the relationship between the media and terrorism. The relationship is complicated by the use of the media by terrorists to optimize the psychological impact of their acts of terror beyond the immediate location of the act itself, and what could cynically be described as the media's use of terrorism to attract audiences. The invasion of a terrorist victim's privacy is the most direct and visible harm from media coverage of terrorism. The invasion of privacy by the media both during and following a terrorist event such as kidnapping, for instance, can be as traumatic to victims and their families as the actual kidnapping itself. If business executives dicker about ransom, for instance, company management will be perceived as insensitive or materialistic in its concern. Thus, publicized ransom decisions can adversely effect executive morale and increase exposure to future terrorist attacks. The public has a valid interest in preserving domestic order.' The media, especially the broadcaster, can often frustrate police management by interfering with on-going operations, compounding the pressure on authorities, and impairing their ability to make decisions. By its very nature, terrorism is meant to capture the attention of the public. It is directed at changing the way society thinks. Modern technology, through television and the capabilities of global satellite communications systems, has provided terror groups with a critical communications instrument through which the terrorist receives instantaneous worldwide publicity. Terrorists use the media as a form of political advertising. Since they cannot buy television time, they gain coverage through commission of terrorist acts. Just as early television sponsors produced shows as vehicles for their commercials, 30 media terrorists now provide live drama-murder and kidnapping-in return for "advertising time".

Keywords

Terrorism, Media, Regulation, 9/11, Media Coverage, Self Constraint.
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  • International Terrorism and Television:An Analytical Discourse Based on Media Regulation on Coverage of Terrorism in Pre and Post 9/11 Scenario

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Authors

Ratnesh Dwivedi
Amity School of Communication, Amity University, Uttar Pradesh, India
Abha Singh
Amity Institute of Psychology and Allied Sciences, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
Sarah Partlow
Dept. of Communication, Idaho State University, Idaho, United States
Anuradha Sharma
Amity Institute of Psychology and Allied Sciences, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


There are numerous parameters that have to be taken into consideration when considering the relationship between the media and terrorism. The relationship is complicated by the use of the media by terrorists to optimize the psychological impact of their acts of terror beyond the immediate location of the act itself, and what could cynically be described as the media's use of terrorism to attract audiences. The invasion of a terrorist victim's privacy is the most direct and visible harm from media coverage of terrorism. The invasion of privacy by the media both during and following a terrorist event such as kidnapping, for instance, can be as traumatic to victims and their families as the actual kidnapping itself. If business executives dicker about ransom, for instance, company management will be perceived as insensitive or materialistic in its concern. Thus, publicized ransom decisions can adversely effect executive morale and increase exposure to future terrorist attacks. The public has a valid interest in preserving domestic order.' The media, especially the broadcaster, can often frustrate police management by interfering with on-going operations, compounding the pressure on authorities, and impairing their ability to make decisions. By its very nature, terrorism is meant to capture the attention of the public. It is directed at changing the way society thinks. Modern technology, through television and the capabilities of global satellite communications systems, has provided terror groups with a critical communications instrument through which the terrorist receives instantaneous worldwide publicity. Terrorists use the media as a form of political advertising. Since they cannot buy television time, they gain coverage through commission of terrorist acts. Just as early television sponsors produced shows as vehicles for their commercials, 30 media terrorists now provide live drama-murder and kidnapping-in return for "advertising time".

Keywords


Terrorism, Media, Regulation, 9/11, Media Coverage, Self Constraint.