Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Analysis of CTLA-4 (+49A/G) Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Babylon province of Iraq


Affiliations
1 College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Hilla, Iraq
2 College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Hilla
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (pTB) is an infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). It typically affects the lungs, but can also affect other sites (extra- pulmonary TB). The disease is spread when sick individuals expel bacteria into the air, for example by coughing. Aim of Study: To highlight the effect of CTLA-4 (+49A/G) gene polymorphism on the risk of pulmonary Tuberculosis (pTB). Patients and Methods: This case-controlled study used single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) to analyze the CTLA-4 (+49A/G) gene polymorphism in 60 patients with pTB who were referred to consultant clinic for respiratory diseases in Hilla – Babylon province/ Iraq during the period from December 2017 to July 2018, and 60 healthy persons’ control. Blood samples were collected from both groups according to the standard methods. Results: Data analysis revealed that the frequencies of AA, AG and GG genotypes in patients were 73.33%, 23.33%, and 3.34% respectively. In controls, this frequency was 51.67%, 35%, and 13.33% respectively. Logistic regression test detected a significant difference in the frequency of the (GG genotype) mutant homozygous of this polymorphism between patients and controls (3.34% versus 13.33%), The GG genotype of CTLA-4(+49A/G) showed a significantly decreased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis disease (OR= 0.18, 95% CI= 0.04 – 0.88, P value = 0.035). Conclusion: The GG genotype of CTLA-4 may decrease the risk of pTB.

Keywords

Pulmonary Tuberculosis; Mycobacterium; CTLA-4
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


Abstract Views: 6

PDF Views: 0




  • Analysis of CTLA-4 (+49A/G) Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Babylon province of Iraq

Abstract Views: 6  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Raafat M. AL-Enzi
College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Hilla, Iraq
Jawad Kadhim Tarrad
College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Hilla, Iraq
Moshtak A. Wtwt
College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Hilla

Abstract


Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (pTB) is an infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). It typically affects the lungs, but can also affect other sites (extra- pulmonary TB). The disease is spread when sick individuals expel bacteria into the air, for example by coughing. Aim of Study: To highlight the effect of CTLA-4 (+49A/G) gene polymorphism on the risk of pulmonary Tuberculosis (pTB). Patients and Methods: This case-controlled study used single specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) to analyze the CTLA-4 (+49A/G) gene polymorphism in 60 patients with pTB who were referred to consultant clinic for respiratory diseases in Hilla – Babylon province/ Iraq during the period from December 2017 to July 2018, and 60 healthy persons’ control. Blood samples were collected from both groups according to the standard methods. Results: Data analysis revealed that the frequencies of AA, AG and GG genotypes in patients were 73.33%, 23.33%, and 3.34% respectively. In controls, this frequency was 51.67%, 35%, and 13.33% respectively. Logistic regression test detected a significant difference in the frequency of the (GG genotype) mutant homozygous of this polymorphism between patients and controls (3.34% versus 13.33%), The GG genotype of CTLA-4(+49A/G) showed a significantly decreased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis disease (OR= 0.18, 95% CI= 0.04 – 0.88, P value = 0.035). Conclusion: The GG genotype of CTLA-4 may decrease the risk of pTB.

Keywords


Pulmonary Tuberculosis; Mycobacterium; CTLA-4



DOI: https://doi.org/10.37506/v14%2Fi1%2F2020%2Fijfmt%2F192972