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What Pressure Driven Membrane Processing has to do with Butter Milk and Whey for Sustainable Income Generation in India


Affiliations
1 Department of Dairy Technology, College of Dairy Science and Food Technology, Raipur (CG), India
2 Department of Dairy Microbiology, College of Dairy Science and Food Technology, Raipur (CG), India
 

Objectives: The present concept explores creation of multidimensional employment opportunities through application of membrane processing in the area of by-products utilization for dairy industry. Membrane filtration assisted utilization of whey and buttermilk not only provides a sustainable source of income but also finds helpful in providing means for food availability and nutritional security.

Methods/Statistical analysis: In this study, methodology has been remained dependent on the nature of food material, size of membrane pores and operating pressure. The nanofiltration technique which operates at a lower pressure than reverse osmosis is to separate water and monovalent salt materials from feed up to a considerable extent as per the required composition of end products. The business elements associated with Integrated Membrane Processing Centre for vibrant entrepreneurial activities find favour under the existing socio-economic situation.

Findings: The need to utilize whey and buttermilk in economic way for generation of income has been a long standing priority as far as dairy industry is to be concerned. Conventional methods of processing have resulted not only in poor quality of products but the ratio of input to output energy has remained unmanageably very high. Due to this reason these by-products have not been found suitability in their utilization creating severe problems of non-conservation of food solids, economic losses and ecological threats. On the other hand very high water content with less per cent of total solids, these by-products are very difficult to handle and require enough large space. In effluent treatment also these by-products further indicate higher incurred cost, longer period of neutralization time as well as use of more chemicals. The present study reveals that use of membrane filtration system has reduced all problems associated with conventional method of processing. Products prepared from membrane processing system ensure better profitability along with negligible wastage.

Application/Improvements: Visualizing existing circumstances of ever worsening employment problem, the application of selected congenial membranes for preparation of value added products is one of the best remedial measures. The establishment of Integrated Membrane Processing Centre (IMPC) is expected to be replicated in various potential regions considering the wider availability of whey and buttermilk.


Keywords

Income Generation, Whey, Buttermilk, Membrane Processing, Business Elements.
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  • What Pressure Driven Membrane Processing has to do with Butter Milk and Whey for Sustainable Income Generation in India

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Authors

Shakeel Asgar
Department of Dairy Technology, College of Dairy Science and Food Technology, Raipur (CG), India
Manorama
Department of Dairy Microbiology, College of Dairy Science and Food Technology, Raipur (CG), India

Abstract


Objectives: The present concept explores creation of multidimensional employment opportunities through application of membrane processing in the area of by-products utilization for dairy industry. Membrane filtration assisted utilization of whey and buttermilk not only provides a sustainable source of income but also finds helpful in providing means for food availability and nutritional security.

Methods/Statistical analysis: In this study, methodology has been remained dependent on the nature of food material, size of membrane pores and operating pressure. The nanofiltration technique which operates at a lower pressure than reverse osmosis is to separate water and monovalent salt materials from feed up to a considerable extent as per the required composition of end products. The business elements associated with Integrated Membrane Processing Centre for vibrant entrepreneurial activities find favour under the existing socio-economic situation.

Findings: The need to utilize whey and buttermilk in economic way for generation of income has been a long standing priority as far as dairy industry is to be concerned. Conventional methods of processing have resulted not only in poor quality of products but the ratio of input to output energy has remained unmanageably very high. Due to this reason these by-products have not been found suitability in their utilization creating severe problems of non-conservation of food solids, economic losses and ecological threats. On the other hand very high water content with less per cent of total solids, these by-products are very difficult to handle and require enough large space. In effluent treatment also these by-products further indicate higher incurred cost, longer period of neutralization time as well as use of more chemicals. The present study reveals that use of membrane filtration system has reduced all problems associated with conventional method of processing. Products prepared from membrane processing system ensure better profitability along with negligible wastage.

Application/Improvements: Visualizing existing circumstances of ever worsening employment problem, the application of selected congenial membranes for preparation of value added products is one of the best remedial measures. The establishment of Integrated Membrane Processing Centre (IMPC) is expected to be replicated in various potential regions considering the wider availability of whey and buttermilk.


Keywords


Income Generation, Whey, Buttermilk, Membrane Processing, Business Elements.

References