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Lap Splice Bond Tests in Self Consolidating Concrete


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1 Department of Mechanical & Civil Engineering Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN 56001
     

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Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) has not yet achieved widespread use in the United States. Some questions remain regarding design and construction issues which could have an effect on the performance and integrity of SCC structures. This paper examines the bond between mild steel reinforcement and SCC. It presents the results obtained from bond response tests performed on beam splice specimens cast with SCC. The bond stress distribution along the length of the reinforcing bars was measured with the aid of strain gauges placed along the length of the bar. Comparisons were made with results from beams cast with ordinary concrete with similar compressive strength to that of the SCC. The results were evaluated with emphasis on the equations for development length of reinforcing bars as specified by the American Concrete Institute Building Code (ACI 318). A theoretical model for predicting splice strength was also evaluated. On average the bond strengths achieved in the SCC beams were found to be 22% higher than those in the equivalent ordinary concrete beams. This could be as a result of more homogeneity in SCC and less material defects from segregation and bleeding.

Keywords

Self Consolidating, Self Compacting, Bond Strength
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  • Lap Splice Bond Tests in Self Consolidating Concrete

Abstract Views: 173  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Farhad Reza
Department of Mechanical & Civil Engineering Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN 56001

Abstract


Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) has not yet achieved widespread use in the United States. Some questions remain regarding design and construction issues which could have an effect on the performance and integrity of SCC structures. This paper examines the bond between mild steel reinforcement and SCC. It presents the results obtained from bond response tests performed on beam splice specimens cast with SCC. The bond stress distribution along the length of the reinforcing bars was measured with the aid of strain gauges placed along the length of the bar. Comparisons were made with results from beams cast with ordinary concrete with similar compressive strength to that of the SCC. The results were evaluated with emphasis on the equations for development length of reinforcing bars as specified by the American Concrete Institute Building Code (ACI 318). A theoretical model for predicting splice strength was also evaluated. On average the bond strengths achieved in the SCC beams were found to be 22% higher than those in the equivalent ordinary concrete beams. This could be as a result of more homogeneity in SCC and less material defects from segregation and bleeding.

Keywords


Self Consolidating, Self Compacting, Bond Strength

References