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Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae in Rhizospheric Soils of Different Crops and Agroclimatic Zones of Himachal Pradesh, India


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1 Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan- 173 230, India
     

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Studies on occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in rhizospheric soils of different crops viz., apple, citrus, litchi, pea, cauliflower, cabbage, fenugreek, mustard, turmeric, maize, and potato growing under diverse agroclimatic regions of Himachal Pradesh was made in the present study. The results reveal that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are widely present in relatively higher population of Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora under brown alluvial soils. Apple, fenugreek, litchi and maize were found to be the best hosts for root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

Keywords

Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Rhizosphere, Root Colonization
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  • Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae in Rhizospheric Soils of Different Crops and Agroclimatic Zones of Himachal Pradesh, India

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Authors

Aradhana Dohroo
Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan- 173 230, India
D.R. Sharma
Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan- 173 230, India
N. P. Dohroo
Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan- 173 230, India

Abstract


Studies on occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in rhizospheric soils of different crops viz., apple, citrus, litchi, pea, cauliflower, cabbage, fenugreek, mustard, turmeric, maize, and potato growing under diverse agroclimatic regions of Himachal Pradesh was made in the present study. The results reveal that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are widely present in relatively higher population of Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora under brown alluvial soils. Apple, fenugreek, litchi and maize were found to be the best hosts for root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

Keywords


Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Rhizosphere, Root Colonization

References