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Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences


Affiliations
1 Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay
2 Clinica Pediatrica “C”, Pereira-Rossel Hospital Centre, University of the Republic, Bulevar Artigas 1550, 11600 Montevideo, Uruguay
3 Pediatric Cardiology Service, Pereira-Rossell Hospital Centre, ASSE, Bulevar Artigas 1550, 11600 Montevideo, Uruguay
 

The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods: 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4-28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results: No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4-8 years), but they started to appear at ∼15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion: Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages.
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  • Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences

Abstract Views: 69  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

S. Curcio
Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay
V. Garcia-Espinosa
Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay
M. Arana
Clinica Pediatrica “C”, Pereira-Rossel Hospital Centre, University of the Republic, Bulevar Artigas 1550, 11600 Montevideo, Uruguay
I. Farro
Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay
P. Chiesa
Pediatric Cardiology Service, Pereira-Rossell Hospital Centre, ASSE, Bulevar Artigas 1550, 11600 Montevideo, Uruguay
G. Giachetto
Clinica Pediatrica “C”, Pereira-Rossel Hospital Centre, University of the Republic, Bulevar Artigas 1550, 11600 Montevideo, Uruguay
Y. Zocalo
Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay
D. Bia
Physiology Department, CUiiDARTE, University of the Republic, General Flores 2125, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay

Abstract


The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods: 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4-28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results: No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4-8 years), but they started to appear at ∼15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion: Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages.