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Production of a Self-Aligned Scaffold, Free of Exogenous Material, from Dermal Fibroblasts Using the Self-Assembly Technique


Affiliations
1 Centre LOEX de l’Universite Laval, Genie Tissulaire et Medecine Regeneratrice, LOEX du Centre de Recherche FRQS du Centre de Recherche de CHU de Quebec, Axe Medecine Regeneratrice, Aile-R Centre Hospitalier Affilie Universitaire deQuebec, 1401 18e rue, Quebec, QC, Canada
2 Departement de Chirurgie, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada
 

Many pathologies of skin, especially ageing and cancer, involve modifications in the matrix alignment. Such tissue reorganization could have impact on cell behaviour and/or more global biological processes. Tissue engineering provides accurate study model by mimicking the skin and it allows the construction of versatile tridimensional models using human cells. It also avoids the use of animals, which gave sometimes nontranslatable results. Among the various techniques existing, the self-assembly method allows production of a near native skin, free of exogenous material. After cultivating human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of ascorbate during two weeks, a reseeding of these cells takes place after elevation of the resulting stroma on a permeable ring and culture pursued for another two weeks. This protocol induces a clear realignment of matrix fibres and cells parallel to the horizon. The thickness of this stretched reconstructed tissue is reduced compared to the stroma produced by the standard technique. Cell count is also reduced. In conclusion, a new, easy, and inexpensive method to produce aligned tissue free of exogenous material could be used for fundamental research applications in dermatology.
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  • Production of a Self-Aligned Scaffold, Free of Exogenous Material, from Dermal Fibroblasts Using the Self-Assembly Technique

Abstract Views: 99  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Stephane Chabaud
Centre LOEX de l’Universite Laval, Genie Tissulaire et Medecine Regeneratrice, LOEX du Centre de Recherche FRQS du Centre de Recherche de CHU de Quebec, Axe Medecine Regeneratrice, Aile-R Centre Hospitalier Affilie Universitaire deQuebec, 1401 18e rue, Quebec, QC, Canada
Stephane Bolduc
Departement de Chirurgie, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada

Abstract


Many pathologies of skin, especially ageing and cancer, involve modifications in the matrix alignment. Such tissue reorganization could have impact on cell behaviour and/or more global biological processes. Tissue engineering provides accurate study model by mimicking the skin and it allows the construction of versatile tridimensional models using human cells. It also avoids the use of animals, which gave sometimes nontranslatable results. Among the various techniques existing, the self-assembly method allows production of a near native skin, free of exogenous material. After cultivating human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of ascorbate during two weeks, a reseeding of these cells takes place after elevation of the resulting stroma on a permeable ring and culture pursued for another two weeks. This protocol induces a clear realignment of matrix fibres and cells parallel to the horizon. The thickness of this stretched reconstructed tissue is reduced compared to the stroma produced by the standard technique. Cell count is also reduced. In conclusion, a new, easy, and inexpensive method to produce aligned tissue free of exogenous material could be used for fundamental research applications in dermatology.