Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures


Affiliations
1 Purdue University, College of Pharmacy and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Center for Health Outcomes Researchand Policy, Robert Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 502A, 575 Stadium Mall Drive,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States
2 WorkLife Programs Human Resources Purdue University, 1601West State Street,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States
3 Purdue University, College of Pharmacy and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Center for Health Outcomes Research and Policy, Robert Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 515, 575 Stadium Mall Drive,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States
 

Objectives: This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods: Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results: There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P =< 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P =< 0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P =< 0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P =< 0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P =< 0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P =< 0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P =< 0.0001). Conclusions: Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data.
User
Notifications
Font Size

Abstract Views: 50

PDF Views: 0




  • Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

Abstract Views: 50  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Joseph Thomas
Purdue University, College of Pharmacy and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Center for Health Outcomes Researchand Policy, Robert Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 502A, 575 Stadium Mall Drive,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States
Mindy Paulet
WorkLife Programs Human Resources Purdue University, 1601West State Street,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States
Jigar R. Rajpura
Purdue University, College of Pharmacy and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, Center for Health Outcomes Research and Policy, Robert Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 515, 575 Stadium Mall Drive,West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091, United States

Abstract


Objectives: This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods: Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results: There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P =< 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P =< 0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P =< 0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P =< 0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P =< 0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P =< 0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P =< 0.0001). Conclusions: Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data.