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Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting as Oral Dysgeusia: An Easily Missed Diagnosis


Affiliations
1 Oral Medicine Department, Bristol Dental Hospital, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, United Kingdom
2 Oral Medicine Department, University of Bristol Dental School, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, United Kingdom
 

We present a case of a fifty-year-oldmale patient who was referred to the Oral Medicine Department with a complaint of a salty taste. History taking subsequently revealed that the patient was also experiencing intermittent numbness of his left lower lip, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the left ear. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed which revealed a large vestibular schwannoma affecting the left vestibulocochlear nerve,whichwas treated surgically. This case shows the importance of taking a detailed history in a patient presenting with an initial complaint of oral dysgeusia. It also highlights the possibility of significant underlying pathology, presenting with initial low level, nonspecific complaints such as an altered taste, and the rationale for imaging patients who report unilateral facial hypoesthesia.
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  • Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting as Oral Dysgeusia: An Easily Missed Diagnosis

Abstract Views: 91  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Emma Brown
Oral Medicine Department, Bristol Dental Hospital, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, United Kingdom
Konrad Staines
Oral Medicine Department, University of Bristol Dental School, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol BS1 2LY, United Kingdom

Abstract


We present a case of a fifty-year-oldmale patient who was referred to the Oral Medicine Department with a complaint of a salty taste. History taking subsequently revealed that the patient was also experiencing intermittent numbness of his left lower lip, tinnitus, and a feeling of fullness in the left ear. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed which revealed a large vestibular schwannoma affecting the left vestibulocochlear nerve,whichwas treated surgically. This case shows the importance of taking a detailed history in a patient presenting with an initial complaint of oral dysgeusia. It also highlights the possibility of significant underlying pathology, presenting with initial low level, nonspecific complaints such as an altered taste, and the rationale for imaging patients who report unilateral facial hypoesthesia.