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A Case of Polyarticular Pasteurella multocida Septic Arthritis


Affiliations
1 McGillUniversity, Montreal,QC, H3A 2T5, Canada
2 Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Mary’s and Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3T 1M5, Canada
3 Division of Infectious Diseases, St. Mary’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3T 1M5, Canada
4 Division of Rheumatology, St. Mary’s and Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5, Canada
 

A 76-year-oldman with a history of osteoarthritis presents with right leg erythema and inability to weight-bear and pain in his right shoulder. Synovial fluid cell count of the knee and shoulder showed abundant neutrophils, and cultures of the knee showed growth of Pasteurella multocida. The patient owned four cats with which he had frequent contact, but history and physical examination elicited no evidence of scratches or bites. This case highlights the invasive potential of Pasteurella multocida in an immunocompetent individual and its capacity to cause septic arthritis in the setting of frequent animal contact.
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  • A Case of Polyarticular Pasteurella multocida Septic Arthritis

Abstract Views: 81  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Sarah Nitoslawski
McGillUniversity, Montreal,QC, H3A 2T5, Canada
Todd M. McConnell
Division of General Internal Medicine, St. Mary’s and Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3T 1M5, Canada
Makeda Semret
Division of Infectious Diseases, St. Mary’s Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3T 1M5, Canada
Michael A. Stein
Division of Rheumatology, St. Mary’s and Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5, Canada

Abstract


A 76-year-oldman with a history of osteoarthritis presents with right leg erythema and inability to weight-bear and pain in his right shoulder. Synovial fluid cell count of the knee and shoulder showed abundant neutrophils, and cultures of the knee showed growth of Pasteurella multocida. The patient owned four cats with which he had frequent contact, but history and physical examination elicited no evidence of scratches or bites. This case highlights the invasive potential of Pasteurella multocida in an immunocompetent individual and its capacity to cause septic arthritis in the setting of frequent animal contact.