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Hepatitis B Awareness and Knowledge in Asian Communities in British Columbia


Affiliations
1 Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2 Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Cape Verde
3 S.U.C.C.E.S.S., 555 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
4 Cancer Control Research Program, BC Cancer Agency, 675West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada
 

Background: Our study examined hepatitis B virus (HBV) awareness and knowledge in Asian communities in British Columbia (BC). Methods. A statistical random sample representation of Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, and Southeast Asian populations in Greater Vancouver was surveyed by telephone. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors ofHBVknowledge. Results:General awareness ofHBVwas reported in 78.8% (798/1013).HBVawareness was the highest in Chinese (89%) and Filipino (88%) populations and the lowest in the South Asian (56%) population. "Reasonable" knowledge of HBV was elicited in 76.8% (778/1013). Higher HBV knowledge was associated with younger age (p = 0.014), higher education (p < 0.0001), Chinese ethnicity (p < 0.0001), and use of media (p = 0.01) and Internet (p = 0.024) for health information. Compared to the Chinese (OR = 1.0) population, "reasonable" knowledge of HBV was lower in Korean (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-0.5), Filipino (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.6), South Asian (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.4), and Southeast Asian (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1- 0.6) populations. 54.8% (555/1013) felt that HBV education was inadequate and 80.1% (811/1013) preferred HBV education in their native languages. Conclusion:Compared to the Chinese population, other Asian communities in BC have lower HBV awareness and knowledge. Public education should target older and less educated and Korean, Filipino, South Asian, and Southeast Asian populations in their native languages via media and Internet.
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  • Hepatitis B Awareness and Knowledge in Asian Communities in British Columbia

Abstract Views: 98  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Alan Hoi Lun Yau
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Jo-Ann Ford
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Peter Wing Cheung Kwan
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Cape Verde
Jessica Chan
S.U.C.C.E.S.S., 555 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Queenie Choo
S.U.C.C.E.S.S., 555 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Tim K. Lee
Cancer Control Research Program, BC Cancer Agency, 675West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Willie Kwong
S.U.C.C.E.S.S., 555 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Alan Huang
S.U.C.C.E.S.S., 555 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Eric Yoshida
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, GLDHCC, 2775 Laurel Street, 5th Floor, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Abstract


Background: Our study examined hepatitis B virus (HBV) awareness and knowledge in Asian communities in British Columbia (BC). Methods. A statistical random sample representation of Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian, and Southeast Asian populations in Greater Vancouver was surveyed by telephone. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors ofHBVknowledge. Results:General awareness ofHBVwas reported in 78.8% (798/1013).HBVawareness was the highest in Chinese (89%) and Filipino (88%) populations and the lowest in the South Asian (56%) population. "Reasonable" knowledge of HBV was elicited in 76.8% (778/1013). Higher HBV knowledge was associated with younger age (p = 0.014), higher education (p < 0.0001), Chinese ethnicity (p < 0.0001), and use of media (p = 0.01) and Internet (p = 0.024) for health information. Compared to the Chinese (OR = 1.0) population, "reasonable" knowledge of HBV was lower in Korean (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-0.5), Filipino (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.6), South Asian (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.2-0.4), and Southeast Asian (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1- 0.6) populations. 54.8% (555/1013) felt that HBV education was inadequate and 80.1% (811/1013) preferred HBV education in their native languages. Conclusion:Compared to the Chinese population, other Asian communities in BC have lower HBV awareness and knowledge. Public education should target older and less educated and Korean, Filipino, South Asian, and Southeast Asian populations in their native languages via media and Internet.