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Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia


Affiliations
1 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, United States
2 Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
3 Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Virology, , University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
4 Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
 

Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIVuninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive.
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  • Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia

Abstract Views: 65  |  PDF Views: 11

Authors

David H. Adler
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, United States
Melissa Wallace
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
Thola Bennie
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
Beau Abar
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642, United States
Tracy L. Meiring
Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Virology, , University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
Anna-Lise Williamson
Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Virology, , University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
Linda-Gail Bekker
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa

Abstract


Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIVuninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive.