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Blow of Textile Industry on Member Weavers' of Silk Handloom Co-operative Societies in Kanchipuram District


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1 Department of Commerce, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Tamil Nadu, India
     

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India is a developing country with majority of its masses living in rural areas. Agriculture is the main source of employment providing work to 70 percent of the rural population. Next to agriculture handloom provides a major source of employment to the rural people in India. Mahatma Gandhi said "the spinning wheel is a nation's second lung". He considered the spinning wheel, a symbol of revolution. So, handloom weaving is the most important cottage and labour intensive industry in India carried out with labour contributed by entire family of the total handlooms in India 72 percent are engaged in cotton weaving, about 16 percent in silk weaving and rest are related to art silk and mixture. Kanchipuram is one of the biggest production centres of pure silk handlooms where no entry of powerlooms is being tolerated nor an introduction of any new techniques of production is readily accepted by the most quality-conscious weavers who are more concerned with the stable fineness of the texture of their handloom fabrics. In Kanchipuram there are around 60,000 silk weavers, out of them 50,000 weavers work under co-operative fold for more than 80 percent of the weavers co-operatives serve as a social asset in term of giving employment, ensuring a fixed wage implementing Government schemes etc., but at present these weavers face lot of problems related to their occupation. This enthused to analyse the blow of textile industry on member weavers of silk handloom co-operative societies in Kanchipuram District.
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  • Blow of Textile Industry on Member Weavers' of Silk Handloom Co-operative Societies in Kanchipuram District

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Authors

R. Jayavel
Department of Commerce, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract


India is a developing country with majority of its masses living in rural areas. Agriculture is the main source of employment providing work to 70 percent of the rural population. Next to agriculture handloom provides a major source of employment to the rural people in India. Mahatma Gandhi said "the spinning wheel is a nation's second lung". He considered the spinning wheel, a symbol of revolution. So, handloom weaving is the most important cottage and labour intensive industry in India carried out with labour contributed by entire family of the total handlooms in India 72 percent are engaged in cotton weaving, about 16 percent in silk weaving and rest are related to art silk and mixture. Kanchipuram is one of the biggest production centres of pure silk handlooms where no entry of powerlooms is being tolerated nor an introduction of any new techniques of production is readily accepted by the most quality-conscious weavers who are more concerned with the stable fineness of the texture of their handloom fabrics. In Kanchipuram there are around 60,000 silk weavers, out of them 50,000 weavers work under co-operative fold for more than 80 percent of the weavers co-operatives serve as a social asset in term of giving employment, ensuring a fixed wage implementing Government schemes etc., but at present these weavers face lot of problems related to their occupation. This enthused to analyse the blow of textile industry on member weavers of silk handloom co-operative societies in Kanchipuram District.

References