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Investigations of Gender Stereotyping in Science Activities And Science Achievement Among Pupils In Public Day Primary Schools in Nakuru Municipality, Kenya


Affiliations
1 School of Education, Laikipia University, Kenya
2 Faculty Of Education And Community Studies, Egerton University, Kenya
     

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This study investigated the effects of gender stereotyping in science activities on science achievement among pupils in public day primary schools. The research design used was a cross-sectional survey. The target population was pupils in public day primary schools in Nakuru municipality, while the accessible population was the class seven pupils. A sample of 160 class seven pupils was involved in the study. Two instruments were used for data collection, Science Achievement Test (SAT) and Pupils Questionnaire (PQ). The instruments were validated and pilot tested and their reliability coefficient obtained estimated. The reliability coefficient of PQ and SAT were found to be 0.79 and 0.75 respectively. Statistical analysis of the quantitative data was done using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient (PPMCC) and t-test at alpha level of 0.05. The results of study revealed that there was a significant gender stereotyping difference in science activities in and out of school among pupils. The study also revealed that there was no relationship between pupils’ experience in science activities and science achievement. This therefore means that curriculum, learning and teaching materials should be engendered to encourage participatory science learning by both girls and boys so as to assist education stakeholders in challenging gender stereotyping in science and its effects in science achievement. It is recommended that gender stereotyping in science courses be reviewed regularly in order to take into account emerging issues and trends.

Keywords

Gender Stereotyping, Science Activities, Science Achievement, Pupils, Public Day Primary Schools.
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  • Investigations of Gender Stereotyping in Science Activities And Science Achievement Among Pupils In Public Day Primary Schools in Nakuru Municipality, Kenya

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Authors

Rose Nyambura
School of Education, Laikipia University, Kenya
Patriciah Wanjiku Wambugu
Faculty Of Education And Community Studies, Egerton University, Kenya

Abstract


This study investigated the effects of gender stereotyping in science activities on science achievement among pupils in public day primary schools. The research design used was a cross-sectional survey. The target population was pupils in public day primary schools in Nakuru municipality, while the accessible population was the class seven pupils. A sample of 160 class seven pupils was involved in the study. Two instruments were used for data collection, Science Achievement Test (SAT) and Pupils Questionnaire (PQ). The instruments were validated and pilot tested and their reliability coefficient obtained estimated. The reliability coefficient of PQ and SAT were found to be 0.79 and 0.75 respectively. Statistical analysis of the quantitative data was done using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient (PPMCC) and t-test at alpha level of 0.05. The results of study revealed that there was a significant gender stereotyping difference in science activities in and out of school among pupils. The study also revealed that there was no relationship between pupils’ experience in science activities and science achievement. This therefore means that curriculum, learning and teaching materials should be engendered to encourage participatory science learning by both girls and boys so as to assist education stakeholders in challenging gender stereotyping in science and its effects in science achievement. It is recommended that gender stereotyping in science courses be reviewed regularly in order to take into account emerging issues and trends.

Keywords


Gender Stereotyping, Science Activities, Science Achievement, Pupils, Public Day Primary Schools.

References