Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

A Critical Appraisal of the Ideology of Monogamy’s Influence on HIV Epidemiology


Affiliations
1 STI Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
2 University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium
3 Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
4 Department of Psychology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
 

The linked ideas that all members of society should only engage in monogamous relationships and that these should all be based on romantic love are decided outliers from a historical perspective. Despite this, there is a widespread contemporary belief that monogamy based on love is the most ethical and natural form of partnering for humans-mononormativism. It has long been accepted that our values influence how we frame and interpret scientific questions. In the article we ask, using the example of mononormativism, how does an individual's sexual ethics influence how they pursue HIV epidemiology? Using a Social Intuitionalist theoretical framework, we argue that a belief in monogamy-as-normative has contributed to certain researchers dismissing the evidence that the generalized HIV epidemics in parts of Africa are due to higher rates of non-monogamy.

Keywords

HIV Epidemiology, Concurrency, Polygamy, Mononormativity, Social-Intuitionalism.
User
Notifications
Font Size

Abstract Views: 105

PDF Views: 0




  • A Critical Appraisal of the Ideology of Monogamy’s Influence on HIV Epidemiology

Abstract Views: 105  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Chris Kenyon
STI Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
Robert Colebunders
University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium
Sipho Dlamini
Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Herman Meulemans
University of Antwerp, Antwerpen, Belgium
Sizwe Zondo
Department of Psychology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa

Abstract


The linked ideas that all members of society should only engage in monogamous relationships and that these should all be based on romantic love are decided outliers from a historical perspective. Despite this, there is a widespread contemporary belief that monogamy based on love is the most ethical and natural form of partnering for humans-mononormativism. It has long been accepted that our values influence how we frame and interpret scientific questions. In the article we ask, using the example of mononormativism, how does an individual's sexual ethics influence how they pursue HIV epidemiology? Using a Social Intuitionalist theoretical framework, we argue that a belief in monogamy-as-normative has contributed to certain researchers dismissing the evidence that the generalized HIV epidemics in parts of Africa are due to higher rates of non-monogamy.

Keywords


HIV Epidemiology, Concurrency, Polygamy, Mononormativity, Social-Intuitionalism.