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A Study on College English Teachers' Role in Developing Learner Autonomy


Affiliations
1 College of Foreign Languages, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan, China
 

The present paper attempts to investigate students' beliefs about college English teachers' role in developing learner autonomy by putting forward three research questions. The answers were explored through the designed questionnaire. The results of the study indicate that as for teachers' role in developing learner autonomy, students' perceptions are in conformity with those of experts and teachers'. From students' perspectives, in developing learner autonomy, teachers are considered to have a major role in teaching students' English learning strategies, monitoring and evaluating students' English learning process in various ways, developing students' positive affection and overcoming negative counterpart, and creating the appropriate English learning environment. It has also been found that some of teachers' actual behavior doesn't match students' expectations. Additionally, LB and LC students are found to be more likely to believe that they can autonomously learn English well without teachers' instruction than LA ones. LC students more favor their English teachers to encourage them to take part in class communicative activities to practice English than LB ones.

Keywords

Learner Autonomy, Teachers' Role, Students' Expectations.
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  • A Study on College English Teachers' Role in Developing Learner Autonomy

Abstract Views: 363  |  PDF Views: 69

Authors

Li Xu
College of Foreign Languages, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan, China

Abstract


The present paper attempts to investigate students' beliefs about college English teachers' role in developing learner autonomy by putting forward three research questions. The answers were explored through the designed questionnaire. The results of the study indicate that as for teachers' role in developing learner autonomy, students' perceptions are in conformity with those of experts and teachers'. From students' perspectives, in developing learner autonomy, teachers are considered to have a major role in teaching students' English learning strategies, monitoring and evaluating students' English learning process in various ways, developing students' positive affection and overcoming negative counterpart, and creating the appropriate English learning environment. It has also been found that some of teachers' actual behavior doesn't match students' expectations. Additionally, LB and LC students are found to be more likely to believe that they can autonomously learn English well without teachers' instruction than LA ones. LC students more favor their English teachers to encourage them to take part in class communicative activities to practice English than LB ones.

Keywords


Learner Autonomy, Teachers' Role, Students' Expectations.

References