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Exploring the Relationship Between Willingness to Communicate in English, and Social/Cultural Capital Among Iranian Undergraduate English Majors


Affiliations
1 Department of English Language and Literature, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran, Islamic Republic of
2 English Department, Islamic Azad University, Torbat-e Heydarieh Branch, Iran, Islamic Republic of
 

Previous research into willingness to communicate in a second language (L2WTC) has focused primarily on its psychological aspects, and its socio-cultural nature is under explored. Framed with a socio-cultural perspective on second language learning, this study examined the relationship between L2 willingness to communicate, social/cultural capital and its five underlying factors including cultural competence, social competence, social solidarity, literacy, and extraversion in the Iranian EFL context. To this end, the Social and Cultural Capital Questionnaire (SCCQ) by Pishghadam, Noghani, and Zabihi (2011) and WTC questionnaire by MacIntyre, Baker, Clement, and Conrad (2001) were administered to a sample of 312 English-major students from three universities in Iran. The Pearson product-moment correlation showed the existence of highly significant correlations between all five factors of SCCQ and learners' L2WTC. Moreover, results from the regression analysis revealed that cultural competence and literacy were the best predictors of WTC. The implications of the study are discussed.

Keywords

Willingness to Communicate, Social Capital, Cultural Capital, Iranian EFL Learners.
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  • Exploring the Relationship Between Willingness to Communicate in English, and Social/Cultural Capital Among Iranian Undergraduate English Majors

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Authors

Hesamoddin Shahriari Ahmadi
Department of English Language and Literature, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran, Islamic Republic of
Ahmad Ansarifar
Department of English Language and Literature, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran, Islamic Republic of
Majid Ansarifar
English Department, Islamic Azad University, Torbat-e Heydarieh Branch, Iran, Islamic Republic of

Abstract


Previous research into willingness to communicate in a second language (L2WTC) has focused primarily on its psychological aspects, and its socio-cultural nature is under explored. Framed with a socio-cultural perspective on second language learning, this study examined the relationship between L2 willingness to communicate, social/cultural capital and its five underlying factors including cultural competence, social competence, social solidarity, literacy, and extraversion in the Iranian EFL context. To this end, the Social and Cultural Capital Questionnaire (SCCQ) by Pishghadam, Noghani, and Zabihi (2011) and WTC questionnaire by MacIntyre, Baker, Clement, and Conrad (2001) were administered to a sample of 312 English-major students from three universities in Iran. The Pearson product-moment correlation showed the existence of highly significant correlations between all five factors of SCCQ and learners' L2WTC. Moreover, results from the regression analysis revealed that cultural competence and literacy were the best predictors of WTC. The implications of the study are discussed.

Keywords


Willingness to Communicate, Social Capital, Cultural Capital, Iranian EFL Learners.

References