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A Study on the Characterization of Hagar Shipley


Affiliations
1 English Teaching and Research Section, Foundation Courses Department, Sichuan Fine Arts Institute, China
2 Foreign Languages College of Inner Mongolia University, Huhhot, Inner Mongolia, China
 

The Stone Angel, the first novel of the Manawaka Cycle, is generally regarded as Laurence's representative work. This novel narrates the story of Hagar Shipley, who struggles to search for her self-identity and freedom all through her life. Hagar's life reflects Canadian ideology and ideological trends during that specific period. Hagar's pride leads to her rebellious life. She seems like the sightless stone angel in the Manawaka cemetery. She cannot realize her pride and prejudice. She cannot understand people around her. People cannot understand her either. Hagar doesn't achieve her self-identity and spiritual freedom until the very end of her life. This thesis intends to analyze the characterization of Hagar and her inner journey towards self-identity and freedom, and further to evaluate Laurence's contribution to Canadian Literature.

Keywords

Margaret Laurence, The Stone Angel, Hagar Shipley, Feminism, Self-Identity, Freedom.
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Abstract Views: 249

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  • A Study on the Characterization of Hagar Shipley

Abstract Views: 249  |  PDF Views: 108

Authors

Hong Xiao
English Teaching and Research Section, Foundation Courses Department, Sichuan Fine Arts Institute, China
Yiwen Gao
Foreign Languages College of Inner Mongolia University, Huhhot, Inner Mongolia, China

Abstract


The Stone Angel, the first novel of the Manawaka Cycle, is generally regarded as Laurence's representative work. This novel narrates the story of Hagar Shipley, who struggles to search for her self-identity and freedom all through her life. Hagar's life reflects Canadian ideology and ideological trends during that specific period. Hagar's pride leads to her rebellious life. She seems like the sightless stone angel in the Manawaka cemetery. She cannot realize her pride and prejudice. She cannot understand people around her. People cannot understand her either. Hagar doesn't achieve her self-identity and spiritual freedom until the very end of her life. This thesis intends to analyze the characterization of Hagar and her inner journey towards self-identity and freedom, and further to evaluate Laurence's contribution to Canadian Literature.

Keywords


Margaret Laurence, The Stone Angel, Hagar Shipley, Feminism, Self-Identity, Freedom.

References