Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Conflict of Philosophies of Education in Public vs. Private School Discourses: An Investigation of English Language Teachers' Teacher-Room Talk in Iranian Context


Affiliations
1 Islamic Azad University, Maragheh Branch, Iran, Islamic Republic of
 

The purpose of this study is to uncover the cultural beliefs and values that underlie the public school and private language institute teachers' representations of their professional identities and figured worlds, through examining discourses that manifested themselves in their teacher-room talks with their peer teachers. The data was collected by means of video recordings of the teachers' natural and face-to-face interactions. Using a multi-layered approach, we analyzed the two groups' speech patterns: 'I-statements', 'narrative lines', 'act sequences and schematic move structures', 'tenses of verbs', 'pronouns', 'hedging vs. boosters', 'topics of talks', 'in-group insults', 'teasing humor', 'mentoring talk', 'professional humor', 'phatic communion and social talk vs. core business talk', 'everyday vs. technical vocabularies', 'laughter', 'lexical density', 'pacing of talk', 'repetition and dramatization', 'the amount of English language used and code-switching' and non-linguistic factors like 'tools', 'objects', and 'bodies' as identity-markers used by the two groups. The findings revealed that speech patterns of the two groups of teachers differed dramatically. The most pervasive macro-speech patterns among public school teachers were 'narratives' and 'social dispute arguments' and that of English language institute teachers were 'work and professional talk with code-switching from Turkish to English' and 'mentoring and viewpoint-giving arguments'. The school teachers' narratives, and social phatic communion talk, in the form of mainly gossip, depicted a 'master dispute figured-world' against authorities, whereas mentoring, viewpoint-giving arguments, work negotiation, and work experiences told by institute teachers were a sign of their 'master work and success figured-world'.

Keywords

Philosophy of Education, Teachers' Room Talk, Macro-Discourses, Speech Patterns.
User
Notifications
Font Size

  • Cots, J. M. (1995). Bringing discourse analysis into the language classroom. Links & Letters 3, 77-101.
  • Gee, J. P. (2010). Introduction to discourse analysis: Theory and method (3rd ed.). London: Routledge.
  • Goffman, E. (1974). Frame analysis. New York: Harper and Row.
  • Grice, H. P. (1975). Logic and conversation. In Peter Cole and Jerry L. Morgan (eds.) Syntax and semantics, vol. 3, Speech acts. New York: Academic Press.
  • Gumperz, J. J. (1982). Discourse strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Halliday, M. A. K. (1994). An introduction to functional grammar. London: Edward Arnold.
  • Hymes, D. H. (1972). On communication competence. In J. B. Pride and Janet Holmes (eds.) Sociolinguistics. Harmondsworth, Middx: Penguin Books.
  • Ignatieva, R. P. (2010). Positioning teachers: A discourse analysis of Russian and American teacher identities in the context of changing national assessment mandates. PhD dissertation. Kent state University.
  • Irwin, B. and Hramiak, A. (2010). A discourse analysis of trainee teacher identity in online discussion forums. Technology, pedagogy and education, 19 (3), 361-377.
  • Jaworski, A. & Coupland, N.(eds.) (1999). The discourse reader. London: Routledge.
  • Kuhi, D. (2008). An analysis of the move structure of textbook prefaces. Asian ESP Journal, 2(4), 63-78.
  • Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
  • Shi-Xu (2005). A cultural approach to discourse. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Swales, J. (1981). Aspects of article introductions. Birmingham, UK: Prentice Hall.
  • Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • van Dijk, T. A. (1980). Macrostructures. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • van Dijk, T. A. (1985). Handbook of Discourse analysis.Vol.2: Levels and Dimensions of Discourse Analysis. London Orlando: Academic Press.
  • van Dijk, T. A. (1997). Discourse as structure and process. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  • Vasquez, C. (2007). Moral stance in the workplace narratives of novices. Discourse Studies, 9(5), 653-675.
  • Widdowson, H. G. (2003). Defining issues in language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Abstract Views: 270

PDF Views: 68




  • Conflict of Philosophies of Education in Public vs. Private School Discourses: An Investigation of English Language Teachers' Teacher-Room Talk in Iranian Context

Abstract Views: 270  |  PDF Views: 68

Authors

Davud Kuhi
Islamic Azad University, Maragheh Branch, Iran, Islamic Republic of
Hamzeh Pazhuman
Islamic Azad University, Maragheh Branch, Iran, Islamic Republic of

Abstract


The purpose of this study is to uncover the cultural beliefs and values that underlie the public school and private language institute teachers' representations of their professional identities and figured worlds, through examining discourses that manifested themselves in their teacher-room talks with their peer teachers. The data was collected by means of video recordings of the teachers' natural and face-to-face interactions. Using a multi-layered approach, we analyzed the two groups' speech patterns: 'I-statements', 'narrative lines', 'act sequences and schematic move structures', 'tenses of verbs', 'pronouns', 'hedging vs. boosters', 'topics of talks', 'in-group insults', 'teasing humor', 'mentoring talk', 'professional humor', 'phatic communion and social talk vs. core business talk', 'everyday vs. technical vocabularies', 'laughter', 'lexical density', 'pacing of talk', 'repetition and dramatization', 'the amount of English language used and code-switching' and non-linguistic factors like 'tools', 'objects', and 'bodies' as identity-markers used by the two groups. The findings revealed that speech patterns of the two groups of teachers differed dramatically. The most pervasive macro-speech patterns among public school teachers were 'narratives' and 'social dispute arguments' and that of English language institute teachers were 'work and professional talk with code-switching from Turkish to English' and 'mentoring and viewpoint-giving arguments'. The school teachers' narratives, and social phatic communion talk, in the form of mainly gossip, depicted a 'master dispute figured-world' against authorities, whereas mentoring, viewpoint-giving arguments, work negotiation, and work experiences told by institute teachers were a sign of their 'master work and success figured-world'.

Keywords


Philosophy of Education, Teachers' Room Talk, Macro-Discourses, Speech Patterns.

References