Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Social Psychology of Auspicious and Ominous Cardinal Numbers in Oriental and Occidental Cultures and Their Translations


Affiliations
1 Jianghan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China
 

Ethnic culture, religious belief, legends and tales have made a great impact on numbers and they are endowed with cultural connotation. People from different cultures look numbers as auspicious or ominous ones which are favourite in a race or taboo in the other. Connotation and associative meaning of the numbers have gestated peculiar digital cultures in different countries. By comparison between Chinese and English numbers in connotation and denotation we may understand the English and Chinese social cultures better and avoid the conflicts and misunderstanding in cross-cultural communications, which can be of help in translating numerical idioms. Translation criteria of numbers are discussed.

Keywords

Number Cultures, Social Psychology, Numerical Languages, Fuzzy Languages, Numerical Translation.
User
Notifications
Font Size

  • Baoqing HU. (2010). Fuzzy Theory. Wuhan: Wuhan University Press.
  • Bingqin Wang. (1998). On Language and Translation. Tianjin: Nankai University Press.
  • Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. (1963). London: Cassell & Company Ltd..
  • D.Dubois, H.Prade. (1980). Fuzzy Sets and Systems-Theory and Applications. New York: Academic Press.
  • Deiser, Oliver. (May 2010). On the Development of the Notion of a Cardinal Number. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (2): 123-143.
  • Dingzhang Wang. (2009). Popular Chinese Customs. Chengdu: Sichuan People's Press.
  • Eugene A. Nida. (2002). Language and Culture. Shanghai: Foreign Language Education Press.
  • Hongqi Wang. (2003). Mysterious Numbers in the Real World. Beijing: China Translation & Publishing Corporation.
  • Huinan Bao. (2004). Cultural Context and Language Translation, Beijing: China Translation & Publishing Corporation.
  • Jianzhong Guo. (2003). Culture and Translation. Beijing: China Translation & Publishing Corporation.
  • Jie Rong. (2003). Numbers, A Special Memory. Chinese Russian Teaching, (3):47-52.
  • Jinzhi Su. (1991). Numerical Totem. Beijing: Language Press.
  • Numerical Idioms: Retrieved July 2, 2014, from http://chengyu.itlearner.com/chaxun.php?q=%D2%BB.
  • Paul P. Wang, (1980). Fuzzy Sets-Theory and Applications to Policy Analysis and Information Systems. New York: Plenum Press.
  • Tieping Wu. (2000). Fuzzy language. Beijing: Beijing Normal University Press.
  • Tieping Wu. (2000). Fuzzy Language. Shanghai: Shanghai Foreign Language Education Press.
  • Xianwen Xu. (2005). On Cultural Semantics of Cardinal Numbers in English and Chinese. Journal of Heilongjiang University, (6):107-111.
  • Xiaoping Xie. (2010). Chinese Idiom Dictionary. Xi'an: Shanxi People's Education Press.
  • Xinchun Su. (1995). Chinese Modern Lexicology. Guangzhou: Guangdong Education Press.
  • Zaixi Tan. (2003). A Review of Nida's Theory on Translation. Beijing: China Translation & Publishing Corporation.
  • Zhengsheng Cai. (1995). Comparison Between Chinese and Japanese Cultures. Beijing: Beijing Foreign Studies University Press.
  • Zhengxu Xu. (2010). Pythagoras. Hefei: Huangshan Press.
  • Zhizhong Li. (2007). Derogotary idioms contained number 2. Journal of Xinjiang University, (3):83-87.
  • Zufeng Luo. (1993). Great Chinese Dictionary. Beijing: Chinese Dictionary Press.
  • Цветаева М.И. (1994). Собраниесочиненийв7Tomax.том2.М.,ЭллисЛак.

Abstract Views: 224

PDF Views: 55




  • Social Psychology of Auspicious and Ominous Cardinal Numbers in Oriental and Occidental Cultures and Their Translations

Abstract Views: 224  |  PDF Views: 55

Authors

Zhenghua Tan
Jianghan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, China

Abstract


Ethnic culture, religious belief, legends and tales have made a great impact on numbers and they are endowed with cultural connotation. People from different cultures look numbers as auspicious or ominous ones which are favourite in a race or taboo in the other. Connotation and associative meaning of the numbers have gestated peculiar digital cultures in different countries. By comparison between Chinese and English numbers in connotation and denotation we may understand the English and Chinese social cultures better and avoid the conflicts and misunderstanding in cross-cultural communications, which can be of help in translating numerical idioms. Translation criteria of numbers are discussed.

Keywords


Number Cultures, Social Psychology, Numerical Languages, Fuzzy Languages, Numerical Translation.

References