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Cognitive Grounding and Its Adaptability to Chinese Noun Studies


Affiliations
1 College of International Studies, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
2 Foreign Languages College, Inner Mongolia University, Huhhot, China
 

Cognitive Grammar is a linguistic theory represented by the symbolic thesis and the usage-based thesis. Cognitive grounding theory is a newly fledged theory in CG. Studies related to grounding have been in their infancy, exhibiting a typological vigor. There have been so far no systematic studies devoted to the grounding system of the Chinese language. Chinese grammar studies applying modern Western linguistic theories have long been the pursuit of scholars from generation to generation. This paper is devoted to introduce grounding theory and then focus on its adaptability to Chinese noun studies. It is concluded that (1) grounding is a cognitive process in which the construal of entities becomes more subjective, and in which a type concept is changed into instances that are singled out by the interlocutors; (2) grounding theory and Chinese noun studies have high adaptability, so Chinese noun studies can be approached from the perspective of Chinese nominal grounding.

Keywords

Cognitive Grammar, Grounding, Adaptability, Chinese Noun Studies.
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  • Cognitive Grounding and Its Adaptability to Chinese Noun Studies

Abstract Views: 282  |  PDF Views: 51

Authors

Xiaoyu Xing
College of International Studies, Southwest University, Chongqing, China
Yubo Zhang
Foreign Languages College, Inner Mongolia University, Huhhot, China
Lifang Chen
Foreign Languages College, Inner Mongolia University, Huhhot, China

Abstract


Cognitive Grammar is a linguistic theory represented by the symbolic thesis and the usage-based thesis. Cognitive grounding theory is a newly fledged theory in CG. Studies related to grounding have been in their infancy, exhibiting a typological vigor. There have been so far no systematic studies devoted to the grounding system of the Chinese language. Chinese grammar studies applying modern Western linguistic theories have long been the pursuit of scholars from generation to generation. This paper is devoted to introduce grounding theory and then focus on its adaptability to Chinese noun studies. It is concluded that (1) grounding is a cognitive process in which the construal of entities becomes more subjective, and in which a type concept is changed into instances that are singled out by the interlocutors; (2) grounding theory and Chinese noun studies have high adaptability, so Chinese noun studies can be approached from the perspective of Chinese nominal grounding.

Keywords


Cognitive Grammar, Grounding, Adaptability, Chinese Noun Studies.

References