Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Fluctuation of Photosynthetic Pigment of Water-Stressed Cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Varieties


Affiliations
1 Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Photosynthetic pigments are responsible for conversion of light energy into a form of chemical energy in the plants. The most important pigment in the light harvesting machinery of the plant is chlorophyll and Carotenoids play an important role in photo-protection of chlorophyll molecules. Cowpea responds to survive under water-deficit conditions via a series of physiological, cellular and molecular processes culminating in stress tolerance. Most cowpea is produced in arid and semi-arid zone. This experiment was conducted in the research field of Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agricultural Technology and Sciences, Allahabad. To study the chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid content of three cowpea varieties (UU-0, VU-89 and KK-6) subjected to the different level of watering (daily watering, 2 days interval, 4 days interval and 6 days interval of watering). The experimental materials were arranged inRandomize Complete BlockDesign. The results indicate that the all photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid content maximum in daily watering whereas at 6 days interval of watering observed minimum.

Keywords

Cowpea, Water Stress, Chlorophyll, Carotenoid.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Al Hasan, M., Fuertes, M. M., Sanchez, F. J. R., Vicente, O. and Boscaiu, M. (2015). Effects of salt and water stress on plant growth and on accumulation of osmolytes and antioxidant compounds in cherry tomato. Not Bot Hort Agrobo, 43(1):111.
  • Ali, Y., Aslam, Z., Hussain, F. and Shakur, A. (2004). Genotype and environmental interaction in cowpea (Vigna unguiculataL.) for yield and disease resistance. Inter. J. Environ. Sci. Technol., 1(2) : 119-123.
  • Dadson, R.B., Hashem, F.M., Javaid, I., Joshi, J., Allen, A.L., and Devine, T.E. (2005). Effect of water stress on the yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes in the delmarva region of the United States. J. Agron. Crop Sci., 191: 210-217.
  • Elsheery, N. and Cao, K.F. (2008). Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and osmotic adjustment in two mango cultivars under drought stress. Acta. Physiologia. Plantarum.,30 : 769-777.
  • Gill, S.S. and Tuteja, N. (2010). Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant machinery in abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. Plant Physiol. Biochem., 48:909-930.
  • Gummuluru, S., Hobbs, S.L.A. and Jana, S. (1989). Physiological responses of drought tolerant and drought susceptible durum wheat genotypes. Photo Synthetica., 23 : 479-485.
  • Kuykendall, L.D., Hashem, F.M., Dadson, R.B. and Elkan, G.K. (2000). Nitrogen Fixation. In: Encyclopedia of Microbiology, Lederberg, J., (Ed.). Academic Press, New York , 329-404pp.
  • Lichtenthaler, H. K. and Wellburn, A. A. (1983). Determination of total carotenoids and chlorophylls a and b of leaf extracts I different solvents. Biochem. Soc. Trans. Ac.,603 : 591-592.
  • Liu, C., Liu, Y., Guo, K., Fan, D., Li, G., Zheng, Y., Yu, L. and Yang, R. (2011). Effect of drought on pigments, osmotic adjustment and antioxidant enzymes in six woody plant species in karst habitats of southwestern China. Environmental and Experimental Botany, 71 : 174-183.
  • Li, Z., Peng, Y. and Ma, X. (2013). Different response on drought tolerance and post-drought recovery between the small-leafed and the large-leafed white clover (Trifolium repens L.) associated with antioxidative enzyme protection and lignin metabolism. Acta. Physiologia. Plantarum., 35 : 213-222.
  • Martins, L.M.V., Xavier, G.R., Rangel, F.W., Ribeiro, J.R.A., Neves, M.C.P., Morgado, L.B. and Rumjanek, N.G. (2003). Contribution of biological fixation to cowpea: A strategy for improving seed yield in the semi-arid region of Brazil. Biol. Fertil. Soils, 38: 333-339.
  • Pastenes, C., Pimentel, P. and Lillo, J. (2005). Leaf movements and photoinhibition in relation to water stress in field- grown beans. J. Exp. Bot., 56 : 425-433.

Abstract Views: 100

PDF Views: 1




  • Fluctuation of Photosynthetic Pigment of Water-Stressed Cowpea Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Varieties

Abstract Views: 100  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Lalit Prakash
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
Pradeep K. Shukla
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
Pragati Misra
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
Suchit A. John
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
Rahul K. Singh
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India
Pramod W. Ramteke
Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture Technology and Sciences, ALLAHABAD (U.P.), India

Abstract


Photosynthetic pigments are responsible for conversion of light energy into a form of chemical energy in the plants. The most important pigment in the light harvesting machinery of the plant is chlorophyll and Carotenoids play an important role in photo-protection of chlorophyll molecules. Cowpea responds to survive under water-deficit conditions via a series of physiological, cellular and molecular processes culminating in stress tolerance. Most cowpea is produced in arid and semi-arid zone. This experiment was conducted in the research field of Department of Biological Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agricultural Technology and Sciences, Allahabad. To study the chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid content of three cowpea varieties (UU-0, VU-89 and KK-6) subjected to the different level of watering (daily watering, 2 days interval, 4 days interval and 6 days interval of watering). The experimental materials were arranged inRandomize Complete BlockDesign. The results indicate that the all photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid content maximum in daily watering whereas at 6 days interval of watering observed minimum.

Keywords


Cowpea, Water Stress, Chlorophyll, Carotenoid.

References