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Threats and Treasure in the Use of Human Jewelry Using Microbial Analysis


Affiliations
1 Department of Microbiology, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria
2 Department of Microbiology, University of Ilorin, P.MB. 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria
 

This study aims at examining the prevalence of microbial contamination of human jewelries and determining the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates. Fifty pieces of gold jewelries comprising 25necklaces and wristwatches each that have not been washed for over four months pre-study were swabbed from volunteer students. Total viable bacteria, coliforms and fungal count were obtained on nutrient agar, MacConkey agar and potato dextrose agar respectively. Pure isolates obtained were characterized in accordance with standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the bacterial isolates were determined using Kirby-Bauer. Necklace samples recorded total viable bacteria count (TVBC) ranged from 1.4 x 104 to 4.3 x 104 cfu/ml while total coliform counts ranged from 0 to 2.9 x 103 cfu/ml. Fungal counts ranged from 1.1 x 103 to 3.1 x 103 cfu/ml. In wristwatch samples, TVBC ranged from 1.3 x 104 to 3.6 x 104 cfu/ml and TCC ranged from 0 to 1.8 x 104 cfu/ml while fungal counts ranged from 1.2 x 103 to 2.7 x 103 cfu/ml. Bacteria isolates include; Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella species, while fungi include Aspergillus niger, Alternaria species, Penicillus species and Epidermophyton species. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus species were resistance to septrin, amoxicillin, gentamicin and tarivids while Klebsiella species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella species and Proteus species were susceptible to sparfloxacin. All isolates were susceptible to augmentin and perfloxacin. This study revealed that pieces of necklaces and wristwatches could be colonized by pathogenic microorganisms. It is therefore very pertinent to regularly sanitize jewelries.

Keywords

Jewelry, Antibiotic, Susceptible, Isolates, Pathogens.
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  • Threats and Treasure in the Use of Human Jewelry Using Microbial Analysis

Abstract Views: 215  |  PDF Views: 44

Authors

I. B. Onajobi
Department of Microbiology, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria
A. I. Adam
Department of Microbiology, University of Ilorin, P.MB. 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria
O. J. Adeyemi
Department of Microbiology, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria

Abstract


This study aims at examining the prevalence of microbial contamination of human jewelries and determining the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates. Fifty pieces of gold jewelries comprising 25necklaces and wristwatches each that have not been washed for over four months pre-study were swabbed from volunteer students. Total viable bacteria, coliforms and fungal count were obtained on nutrient agar, MacConkey agar and potato dextrose agar respectively. Pure isolates obtained were characterized in accordance with standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the bacterial isolates were determined using Kirby-Bauer. Necklace samples recorded total viable bacteria count (TVBC) ranged from 1.4 x 104 to 4.3 x 104 cfu/ml while total coliform counts ranged from 0 to 2.9 x 103 cfu/ml. Fungal counts ranged from 1.1 x 103 to 3.1 x 103 cfu/ml. In wristwatch samples, TVBC ranged from 1.3 x 104 to 3.6 x 104 cfu/ml and TCC ranged from 0 to 1.8 x 104 cfu/ml while fungal counts ranged from 1.2 x 103 to 2.7 x 103 cfu/ml. Bacteria isolates include; Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella species, while fungi include Aspergillus niger, Alternaria species, Penicillus species and Epidermophyton species. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus species were resistance to septrin, amoxicillin, gentamicin and tarivids while Klebsiella species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella species and Proteus species were susceptible to sparfloxacin. All isolates were susceptible to augmentin and perfloxacin. This study revealed that pieces of necklaces and wristwatches could be colonized by pathogenic microorganisms. It is therefore very pertinent to regularly sanitize jewelries.

Keywords


Jewelry, Antibiotic, Susceptible, Isolates, Pathogens.

References