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Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior towards Dietary Salt Intake among Bangladeshi Population


Affiliations
1 Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
2 Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh (SUB), Dhaka, Bangladesh
3 Department of Community Nutrition, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
4 Department of Physiotherapy, State College of Health Sciences (SCHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
 

Dietary salt intake behavior is higher among Bangladeshi population than the global perspective with also higher prevalence of extra salt intake during meal. Salt intake practices depend on the level of knowledge and attitude of the people. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards dietary salt intake among the Bangladeshi population. It was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 466 adult respondents (age≥18 years) from all of the seven divisional districts of Bangladesh. Data were collected from the government declared public places following convenient sampling technique; Face-to-face interviews were conducted using WHO Modified Salt Module of STEPS Questionnaire. Men respondents were more (74.7%), mean age was 34.2±12.9 years. More than two in every five respondents (44.4%) believed that they were used to consume just right amount of salt, whereas 60.7% believed that too much salt could cause serious health problems, and it was very important to lower salt intake among 38.8% respondents. More than two third (72.5%) of respondents were used to add extra salt during their meals, noticeable proportion was regular user (25.1%). Most of them were used to practice high salt content processed food in sometimes basis (29.8%). In a conclusion, it was noticed little gap between level of knowledge as well as attitude and level of salt and salty foods practices among the Bangladeshi population.

Keywords

Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior, Dietary Salt.
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  • Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior towards Dietary Salt Intake among Bangladeshi Population

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Authors

Rajib Mondal
Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Rajib Chandra Sarker
Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Palash Chandra Banik
Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Narayan Prasad Acharya
Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Sadiya Sultana
Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh (SUB), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Madumita
Department of Community Nutrition, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh
Md. Shamim Hosen
Department of Physiotherapy, State College of Health Sciences (SCHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh

Abstract


Dietary salt intake behavior is higher among Bangladeshi population than the global perspective with also higher prevalence of extra salt intake during meal. Salt intake practices depend on the level of knowledge and attitude of the people. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards dietary salt intake among the Bangladeshi population. It was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 466 adult respondents (age≥18 years) from all of the seven divisional districts of Bangladesh. Data were collected from the government declared public places following convenient sampling technique; Face-to-face interviews were conducted using WHO Modified Salt Module of STEPS Questionnaire. Men respondents were more (74.7%), mean age was 34.2±12.9 years. More than two in every five respondents (44.4%) believed that they were used to consume just right amount of salt, whereas 60.7% believed that too much salt could cause serious health problems, and it was very important to lower salt intake among 38.8% respondents. More than two third (72.5%) of respondents were used to add extra salt during their meals, noticeable proportion was regular user (25.1%). Most of them were used to practice high salt content processed food in sometimes basis (29.8%). In a conclusion, it was noticed little gap between level of knowledge as well as attitude and level of salt and salty foods practices among the Bangladeshi population.

Keywords


Knowledge, Attitude, Behavior, Dietary Salt.

References