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Orchids……Potential in Temperate Areas


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1 Sher-e-Kashmir University Agricultural Sciences and Technology-K, Srinagar (J&K), India
     

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India is recognized as a significant producer of orchids in the world. Near about 1,300 species of orchids are found in India which constitutes almost 10 per cent of the world orchid flora with Himalayas as their main home (Medhi and Chakrabarthi, 2009). Orchids are the most fascinating and beautiful flowering plants belonging to family orchidaceae. Orchidaceae is a cosmopolitan family distributed throughout the world. Orchids is most highly evolved family among monocotyledons with near about 1000 genera and 25,000-35,000 species which exhibit an incredible range of diversity in size, shape and of the colour of their flowers. About 200 orchid species are found in North-Western Himalayas, 800 in North-Eastern India while as 300 orchids occur in Western Ghats. North- Eastern India owing to its peculiar gradient and varied climatic conditions contains largest group of temperate, sub-tropical orchids (Rao, 2004). India has a very large variety of orchids and hilly regions have one or the other orchid species flowering almost throughout the year. The diversity is so large that there are large-flowered, terrestrial, epiphytic and also saprophytic orchids. The largest terrestrial genus is Habenaria (100 spp.) and the largest epiphytic genus is Dendrobium (70 spp.)
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  • Orchids……Potential in Temperate Areas

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Authors

Arif Hussain Wani
Sher-e-Kashmir University Agricultural Sciences and Technology-K, Srinagar (J&K), India

Abstract


India is recognized as a significant producer of orchids in the world. Near about 1,300 species of orchids are found in India which constitutes almost 10 per cent of the world orchid flora with Himalayas as their main home (Medhi and Chakrabarthi, 2009). Orchids are the most fascinating and beautiful flowering plants belonging to family orchidaceae. Orchidaceae is a cosmopolitan family distributed throughout the world. Orchids is most highly evolved family among monocotyledons with near about 1000 genera and 25,000-35,000 species which exhibit an incredible range of diversity in size, shape and of the colour of their flowers. About 200 orchid species are found in North-Western Himalayas, 800 in North-Eastern India while as 300 orchids occur in Western Ghats. North- Eastern India owing to its peculiar gradient and varied climatic conditions contains largest group of temperate, sub-tropical orchids (Rao, 2004). India has a very large variety of orchids and hilly regions have one or the other orchid species flowering almost throughout the year. The diversity is so large that there are large-flowered, terrestrial, epiphytic and also saprophytic orchids. The largest terrestrial genus is Habenaria (100 spp.) and the largest epiphytic genus is Dendrobium (70 spp.)

References